Salisbury Incident:

The American fake news is not at fault here. This Salisbury incident has gotten sparse coverage here just because America is so isolationist and it didn’t happen here. Cheops Books LLC is interested only because we visited Salisbury in 2012 and made it a place of significance in the Edward Ware Thriller Series.

Cheops Books LLC has read that Salisbury is NOT carrying on as normal. It’s tourist trade has taken a big hit. Even people from Great Britain won’t go there let alone tourists from America. This is part of what I am talking about.

Also as to how it spreads, how would you know who was there at the time or who comes from Salisbury if you are a stranger in a strange land? If you are paranoid enough, you would tend to avoid everybody because you don’t know who is who. Also you wonder if these secret Russian agents are still at large. What is their next plan? Are they going after someone else in Great Britain? Who? When? Where? You think you might be unlucky enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

The Russians may be claiming they were framed, but that is impossible. Terrorists wouldn’t have access to such materials. The guy was a Russian spy. How many others would know that except the Russians? Cheops Books LLC will agree that it may not have been Putin, but it has to be somebody he knows.

Cheops Books LLC will publish Salisbury Affair by Dora Benley on May 4.

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Cheops Books LLC Took Shore Excursion To Salisbury:

When Cheops Books LLC took the shore excursion in July of 2012 to Salisbury Cathedral and Stonehenge, the tour guide told us when we were coming into town in Salisbury about his memories of World War 2 as a little boy. He remembered being given candy by American and Canadian GI’s waiting to be shipped out for operations such as D-Day. He showed us where all the units were housed along the roads as we got closer and closer to Salisbury.

The tour guide did not mention chemical weapons factories outside of Salisbury, but what we suspect is that they must be north of town since south of town is the New Forest which we drove through and which is a national park. But we are sure they are there as you say.

The area around Salisbury has been from time immemorial a place to see the coming and going of armies in Britain from the time of the Romans and Julius Caesar to the time of William the Conqueror and onward to the present time. In fact the whole south coast of England along the Channel from Southampton to Dover is important from the strategic point of view. Dover Castle was actually used during WW2. The evacuation from Dunkirk was directed from the castle.

That is one of the reasons Cheops Books LLC chose Salisbury as the town nearest Ware Hall, home of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers At War Series. It is a military setting. He is in the military. All of his ancestors back to Roman times have been in the military, too.

Still that is no justification for the Russians to use chemical weapons there especially against civilians. Cheops Books LLC remembers that the town also had a medieval atmosphere. Salisbury Cathedral itself had such a medieval feel about it that it might as well have had knights in shining armor at the doors. It certainly had a lot of stained glass windows. All around town are bronze age burial mounds. What is now to happen to all of this?

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Cheops Books LLC Betrayed By Russians:

Cheops Books LLC is about to publish a novel in the Edward Ware Thriller Series called Salisbury Affair. It is about Dora and Edward’s wedding at Salisbury Cathedral. We are having a Facebook Party on May 4, and the debate is going to be about this subject.

We here at Cheops Books LLC feel betrayed that the Russians attacked Salisbury. It is as if they attacked our novel. That is a place that the author, Dora Benley, has incorporated into the world of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novels. It is the town closest to Edward’s estate, Ware Hall, the ancestral home of his family that we find out later goes back to Roman times.

Salisbury Cathedral is where Dora and Edward were married. Ware Hall is practically burned to the ground in Captive at the Berghof by Helga and Hitler in September of 1940 during the Blitz, killing Edward’s mother. That is enough of a profanation.

But this chemical weapon of the Russians is far worse. After World War 2, the Wares renovate Ware Hall with Dora’s money. Leopold later completes the job as he reveals in Dark 3: Special Edition. But you cannot renovate what is contaminated by chemical weapons. It is like radiation. It might be there for a long time and you wouldn’t want to visit again. It turns the town of Salisbury, which our tour guide in 2012 called “God’s own country” along with all of Wiltshire, into Love Canal — or even Chernobyl.

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Russia And The Nerve Agent:

Where you get the idea that dysfunctional countries have all this power I have no idea except that it makes a good story. First you think North Korea is a threat. Now you think Russia is a threat, maybe China too. Russia is at the foot of the west, the same position it occupied one hundred years ago during WW1 and the Russian Revolution. (It was even at the foot of the west before that during the time of the czars when Peter the Great imitated Holland and other European countries when he built St. Petersburg).

Russia was the country that suffered the most during WW1 and WW2, hardly a position that would make it a threat. It has never had much of an economy, and its people were all too recently freed from serfdom. The powers that created the world wars were the leading powers, and are still the leading powers such as the US, England, Japan, Germany, etc. Hardly surprising. (Germany, by the way, is the KEY to making Russia actually work. Historically this has been true since before the time of Peter the Great. )

The Russians don’t have the power to do much of anything at all. The real danger — and it actually happened one hundred years ago — is that if you put pressure on the farce that is the Russian government it will implode and cause chaos within Russia and a tanks in the streets the way you did in the early 1990s after the fall of the Soviet Union. You will have a civil war that will rock Eastern Europe and cause chaos that will affect western Europe. This is what the western powers are trying to avoid.

The Russians would NEVER shoot a missile at America. It is doubtful if their technology is up to it, but even if it is, they know it would spell the end of their country. Beating America into space is laughable and hardly worth mentioning. If America is not pursuing the space station it is because they don’t want to. Private individuals such as Jeff Bezos are doing it here instead. Russia in WW2 showed how their army didn’t hold together in Berlin and fought itself. Stalin tried to make his generals compete with each other, etc — totally stupid. The only reason they got that far was because of American aid.

This nerve agent was supposedly something that was stockpiled during World War 2 and never used. After the war you were supposed to destroy your reserves of it. The Russians claimed that they had gotten rid of all of it — ha! They obviously kept the stockpile. This is an attack on Britain with war grade chemical weapons and should be treated as such. Such things should NEVER be permitted, and this is a flagrant violation of the rule that should not be allowed to get out of hand.
Even if the Americans don’t participate, the British navy should sail past St. Petersburg, Russia and warn the Russians.

Russia and the Russian Dictator Stalin played an important part in the upcoming Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel Unlocking Trinity.

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On The Road Again By Cheops Books LLC: Salisbury

What on earth is going on here? It is two days later, Friday, March 16, when I finally read this breaking news from Europe about the Skripal poisoning in Salisbury. Cheops Books LLC visited Salisbury, England in 2012. There is a photo on the refrigerator right now snapped in front of Salisbury Cathedral. It seems like so many terrorist like things have occurred all over Europe since we last visited in 2015. We have asked our local Russian expert. He says that just because it was an attack by Russians doesn’t mean it was ordered by Putin. Putin is not in charge of everything that goes on in his government. But what good does imposing sanctions do? Attacks of all sorts just go on and on. Inevitably you realize that the West has been propping up the Putin government so that they are not faced with chaos in Eastern Europe that could affect Western Europe.

But is also raises the question of travel in Europe. It just does not seem safe anymore. It especially is disillusioning when somebody attacks a site that you personally have visited. That brings home the level of danger like nothing else can. Cheops Books LLC is getting ready to publish Salisbury Affair, the second volume of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novels. Big scenes occur at Salisbury Cathedral which is pictured on the cover of the thriller. Perhaps we should include a footnote or afterword in the novel that discusses this decisive event.

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Questions To Be Discussed In Paris Peace Plot:

I’m not even sure the Titanic was the “accident” with the greatest long term consequences even in terms of “ship accidents” but I would have to think about that one in Paris Peace Plot. Wireless may have become compulsory on all vessels. The Lusitania had it, and it didn’t do them any good three years later after the Titanic. The First Lord of the Admiralty, Churchill, never sent the ships to escort the Lusitania into port safely no matter how many times Captain Turner called him in Paris Peace Plot. Churchill was off in Paris. The Lusitania may have had more lifeboats than the Titanic but they became largely useless because of the extreme list of the ship in Paris Peace Plot. The Titanic may have promoted water tight compartments, but the Lusitania sank in fifteen minutes anyway because of the torpedo and the second mysterious explosions in Paris Peace Plot. Also the Lusitania was really an older ship than the Titanic and had been sailing already for the better part of 10 years just like the Lusitania‘s sister ship, the Mauretania.

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Roman Army More Destructive Than Atomic Bomb:

We read about Scipio Aemilianus, head of the Roman army, weeping at the end of the Third Punic War as he stood by the historian, Polybius, and supervised the systemic burning and destruction of Carthage. The last 50,000 citizens presented an olive branch to the Roman army and marched out of the doomed city to a life of slavery. Aemilianus quoted Homer about Troy. But Oppenheimer on July 16, 1945 when he watched the first nuclear explosion quoted Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds”. The atomic bomb is supposed to be the ultimate weapon destroying more than anything else. But really the Roman army at Carthage after the Third Punic War destroyed more —- and they didn’t even have guns or explosives at all!

Rome  and the Roman army took apart a whole civilization and obliterated all traces of it. Nothing survived for very long, not even the art or culture after the last ruler of Carthage committed suicide and his wife threw her children into the flames and then leaped into the flames herself. But after World War 1 and World War 2 the defeated parties not only survived but prospered and in very short order, too. The United States and Britain didn’t burn all the German cities to the ground and enslave whole populations. Germany and Japan came right back after the war and became economic engines again. Rome and the Roman army would never have permitted this with Carthage.

We are commemorating the 100th anniversary of World War 1. Europe cannot get over the Battle of the Somme and other similar battles losing thousands of men. But Rome and the Roman army suffered more during the Second Punic War, especially during the Battle of Cannae, and got over it very quickly. Nor did it make Rome hate war and want to avoid it at all costs.

This attitude that somehow the past was more peaceful and the present more violent needs to be re-examined. It doesn’t fit the facts. The Punic Wars seem more horrible than either World War 1 or World War 2.

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Princess Tanit And Carthage Has Been Destroyed:

Gaius Antonius gave the order to retreat toward the Balearic Islands. There was no shame in it when they were so outnumbered. But considering the speed of the pursuing ships, he had better high tail it out of here quickly and in effect do the equivalent of a vanishing act. He caught the glare of Tanit and cursed her. He would not stop until she was dead. He had promised Cato.

He sailed back the way he had come with what looked like a whole navy coming after him. He sailed into a hidden cove on one of the more obscure Balearic Islands. His ship and the other one that had come with him were totally hidden by rocks. He sent a lookout up the cliff to conceal himself behind a tree and watch what the other navy did. He reported back not long after that they had sailed past the island all together.

Gaius Antonius had escaped to the Balearic Islands. A couple days later he sailed back into the port at Carthage. He told Scipio what had happened and how Tanit had almost led him into a trap. He swore he would capture her and make her pay or his name was not Cato.

As Scipio’s siege engines grew higher and higher until they were almost the height of the walls of Carthage itself, he saw Tanit appear on the walls again and again. Soldiers would appear and throw missiles down on the Romans to distract them when they were working on the siege engines, and the Princess Tanit would appear with them. She would raise above her head the souvenir she obviously took when she appeared in Rome at Cato’s latifundia. She must have been there in the room when his father was murdered. She was holding Cato’s other pen besides the one that had been clutched in his hand. It was an open insult.

At long last the siege engines were finished, and the city of Carthage was about ready to starve. Just as Scipio was giving the order to his legionaries to attack, an olive branch was seen on the walls. The ordinary folk of Carthage were surrendering. Scipio accepted their surrender, and the gates of the city opened wide as fifty thousand citizens marched out to surrender to the Roman legions and be made into slaves. Gaius knew that Tanit would not be among those numbers. She would never surrender.

When the final push came he entered the city behind his soldiers directing their activities as they pushed through the streets of Carthage taking building after building. They slaughtered the residents who had not surrendered floor by floor and then razed the buildings themselves as they progressed down the street. What was left in the rubble was burned after it had been thoroughly pillaged and sacked for valuables.

Gaius looked around and watched out of the corner of his eye to see if he could detect where Princess Tanit was hiding. They were approaching the royal palace. He gave the order to his soldiers to sack that structure next, which they were eager to do because of all the booty.
First they broke down the double doors. They ran against them repeatedly with a ram. When they finally gave way there stood a lone figure staring daggers at Gaius from the top of the gilded stairway. It was Princess Tanit! Gaius barked the orders to his soldiers to sack the first floor and pull off the gold ornaments and valuables from the walls and doors and furniture before they ascended to the next floor and the next and finally prepared to demolish the building. Then he raced up the stairs after Tanit himself.

She was as swift as a lynx running from room to room, but finally he pulled a rug out from under her feet and toppled her to the ground. He leaped on top of her and struggled from side to side while he tried to pry that pen from her right hand. He forced open her fingers and finally took back Cato’s second pen that he always used to write speeches before delivering them in the Senate House. Gaius could only imagine how many times this pen had written the words: Carthage must be destroyed.

Tanit took advantage of the opportunity to leap up while he was taking back the pen. She fled out onto the balcony attached to the upper level room of the Carthaginian royal palace.
Gaius followed her only to suddenly come upon the wife of the lead general of the Carthaginians, Hasdrubal, pontificating and prancing frantically back and forth on the balcony crying down to the Romans below. She decried her cowardly husband who had just surrendered to the Romans and could be seen kneeling at the feet of Scipio Aemilianus right this minute. She lifted up one of her children after the other and threw them into the burning city below. Then she climbed up onto the balcony and threw herself into the flames with a giant scream.

Princess Tanit backed up away from Gaius Antonius. She shook her head and cried out, “You shall never put your dirty hands on me again, Roman. You act like a colony of red ants crawling all over our city and pulling it down to the ground. But still I will not be your slave or your prisoner. Nor will I ever again have to look at or meet or be the prisoner of that madman, your father, who inspired all this destruction. At least I killed him, and I am glad I lived long enough to do so. It was no soldier who did it for me. It was this hand that wielded the bow and arrow that killed him.” She shouted out her final defiant brag to Gaius.

With that Tanit leaped up onto the balcony wall. She glared at Gaius for one second longer. Then she, too, leaped into the flames.

Gaius Antonius looked out over the burning city of Carthage. Flames leaped high. He saw the visage of his father rising like the sun over all. He spoke to him. “Father, just as you said, Carthage must be destroyed. Well, I am finally and at last reporting to you, Carthage has been destroyed.”

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Tanit Sails Away In The Middle Of The Night:

Gaius was so indignant about Tanit murdering his father in cold blood — the very man who had once paid host to her when she was visiting Rome and his latifundia — that he immediately scribbled a note and sent for Scipio Aemilianus though it was the middle of the night.

About an hour later Scipio arrived fully dressed in his military outfit. Gaius filled him in on what had just happened and how Tanit had outwitted them in the end and was now sailing away scott free at night.

“I think we should start sending the Roman navy to Carthage tomorrow,” Gaius insisted. “We cannot let her get away with murdering my father and not paying for the crime.”

Scipio nodded. “We will send the patrol boats to give them a scare. Of course the rest of the Roman army will be sailing within the week. We should all make it by Wednesday next.”

Gaius did not go back to bed that night. He worked straight way through packing his essentials for the campaign against Carthage. He wanted to leave with the advance boat to see if he could somehow catch Tanit before she arrived back in Carthage. He confided in Scipio that he wanted to go and why. And of course Scipio, the commander, honored his wish.

But as it turned out Gaius ended up sailing across the entire Mediterranean without once catching sight of the bitch of his creating. He had once flirted with her and encouraged her, making an absolute fool of himself. Fortunately nobody knew about it but himself and even that was too many people.

Days later they sailed into the port of Carthage, built as an amazing great circle in front of the city walls. It was now almost all emptied out. As they sailed up the last ships were disappearing out to sea. It would not do them much good. Soon they would not be able to bring in provisions no matter what.

Gaius gazed out to sea. He hoped one of those boats was not Tanit. He did not want her to escape.
Scipio was an experienced expert at siege warfare. They at once began constructing great siege engines. It was a slow way to get vengeance but a more certain one that trying to make attacks and enter the city prematurely. But still he worried about Tanit.

“Scipio, I would like to take a ship or two and follow that last Carthaginian ship out of the harbor,” Gaius explained. “I think it may be the princess of Carthage who stayed at Cato’s house as a hostage and a guest and then turned on him and murdered him in cold blood.”
 Of course Scipio gave his permission as the leading general. Gaius set sail in the direction the ship had escaped.

But the ship proved very elusive and hard to follow just like Tanit. It would appear on the horizon far ahead of them only from time to time and then mysteriously disappear again. It only appeared often enough so that they could still follow it. And it was progressing quite a distance, too. It was obviously not headed for a neighboring port such as the Samnites.

He headed out onto the open sea wondering if Tanit would lead him to a secret stash of weapons or soldiers that he should know about. It took a couple days where he would catch sight of the ship and once again it would elude him. And another restless night would pass.

All too soon he found himself back in Spanish waters approaching the port of New Carthage. But low and behold, no sooner did the port come in view than he saw a Phoenician navy massed there to greet him. All the ships looked like the one he had drawn for Cato not that long ago. He had brought only two Roman ships with him. He had followed Tanit into a trap. Worse, he could catch sight of the Princess herself on the upper deck next to the captain. Her hand was clapped over her mouth. She was laughing at him. Her eyes were full of evil mirth — and fire.

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Scipio Aemilianus Chosen To Lead Expedition:

The next weeks were spent in such a hustle and bustle that Gaius hardly remembered either his old name or his new. He and Lavinia were married almost right away with the full Senate in attendance. But instead of bringing her home to his real father’s and mother’s house, they stayed in the house where she had grown up as Cato’s ward, Cato’s house. Scipio Aemilianus was picked to lead the expedition to Carthage. He was the adopted heir of Scipio Africanus, the hero of the Second Punic War. Gaius was given the rank of a tribune under Scipio.

Soldiers were taking on supplies. The Roman navy was repairing its vessels and buffing them up to make the journey across the Mediterranean Sea. Gaius Antonius and his fellow officers were taking the new and raw recruits out of town into the surrounding countryside to practice basic military maneuvers and exercises every day.

That morning before he left Cato’s house in town (they had not gone out to the latifundia lately because of all the military activity and meetings of the Senate) Cato summoned him into his office. He said, “The Roman army should plan to set sail for Carthage in about a week’s time. We don’t want to allow them too much time to take on supplies and build up their navy.”

“I am sure that sounds like the wisest course of action,” Gaius said to his new father.

They had held a big dinner for all the senators and their families only a few days ago right before the wedding. At the dinner Cato had declared that Gaius Antonius would be his new son and would carry his name and inherit his fortune and his lands. He would also take his place in the Senate when the time came, though everyone knew that no one could really do that. Certain papers and documents had been signed and witnessed. They had been handed over to the Vestal Virgins to keep in the House of the Vestal Virgins.

He promised Cato that he would do his best to stick on schedule. He was never more surprised than when in the middle of his military exercises his new wife, Lavinia, appeared on horseback. He excused himself and rushed over to her.

She hurried up to him with an expression of consternation on her face. “Gaius, Cato has been murdered!” she shouted.

He could hardly credit what she was saying. “What on earth are you talking about?” he asked his wife. “I just got done talking to him about leaving for Carthage within a week’s time!”

She gripped his military vest. “I went into his office to talk to him after luncheon. He was lying slumped on his writing desk. At first I thought he was asleep. But then I saw the arrow in his shoulder.”

Gaius could not take it all in. But he knew he had to act right away. He returned to his unit briefly to make his excuses that family matters had to be attended to. He was not going to repeat what his wife had said until he saw what was going on with his own two eyes. He saddled his own horse and followed her back into town to Cato’s house.

He hurried into his new father’s study. Things were just as she had told him. Only a frightened slave had hurriedly been appointed to watch things and make sure nothing was disturbed until they got back. He hurried up to Lavinia and practically hung on her for reassurance while Gaius dashed right up to Cato.

He took Cato by the shoulders and shook him, calling upon his name, “Cato, Cato, speak to me!” In life that was the most important thing he always did —- speak. His eyes were staring as lifeless as Lavinia had told him. But unlike Lavinia his eyes caught sight of a notepad next to Cato’s hand which was still holding his pen, very fitting to the last. On a piece of papyrus he had managed to scrawl, “The Carthaginians have killed me —- shot me through the window. Carthago delenda est.”

Indeed when Gaius turned the window in question was still open. He went to look and horrifyingly enough he could still detect the presence of human feet in the dust. They had left their incriminating shoe prints behind. Not that he would ever doubt what his father said, but this was all too accurate to be borne.

Gaius could not ask Cato what to do now. Cato was no more. He was now Cato. People would look to him to act as his father would have.

Keeping his wits about him he summoned Scipio Aemilianus to his house right away. Scipio rushed away from the military field and came right away. When he saw what tragedy had occurred he immediately decided, “We must sail even sooner than one week against Carthage.”

Gaius nodded. “I would whole heartedly agree. That is what Cato would have said.”

The next day they arranged for Cato’s funeral in the Forum in front of all Rome because this was a decisive event in the history of the Roman Republic. Many would always remember this day and tell their children and children’s children about it.

Gaius made a speech as the funeral pyre was lighted and Cato joined his noble ancestors. “On this day Rome resolves to do whatever it takes to defeat our mortal enemy, Carthage.”

Everybody cheered.

“We should not have allowed them to pay reparations for the past fifty years. Then this horrible tragedy would not have occurred,” he said.

Again the mob cheered.

“Now we must complete what we started in the time of our grandfathers. And in the words of my father, the great man that all Rome depended upon to see the right course for it to follow, the very last words that the dying man wrote on this piece of papyrus for us all to see after he had been struck by an arrow —- Carthago delenda est. Carthage must be destroyed.”

Gaius waved Cato’s last paper in the air over his head. The mob errupted into vengeful cheers that seemed to raise the roofs of the surrounding buildings. They did not stop shouting until Cato’s funeral was over and he was buried in a family mausoleum along the Appian Way.

The entire city state was mobilized as never before. They were all resolved to avenge Cato’s death by destroying Carthage. They had determined to leave Rome in five days’ time.

But the very next night his wife, Lavinia, awoke him. They had retired for one night to the latifundia to enlist the slaves who would go with them to war and not be left behind along with the small tenant farmers surrounding Cato’s estate. She complained that she was having a strange dream that made her restless and would not let her sleep. She kept on thinking that something or somebody was outside the window.

That was only natural considering what had just happened to her Uncle Cato. She urged her husband to look. Then she pointed leaning out the window herself. “Look down there at the sea! Look at that ship!”

Gaius followed Lavinia’s pointed finger. She indeed had a keen eye. He recognized the ship immediately under a bright moon. It was the very ship that he had drawn on the map for Cato, the one with the big sails. And he did not think he was imagining it when he thought he recognized the woman’s figure on the prow of the ship as it passed underneath the headland at the edge of the latifundia. Why, that was Tanit! She had returned to Rome to murder Cato.

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