Demon From Egypt by Dora Benley:

In Demon From Egypt Cheryl must spend the summer cleaning the beach house and collecting mail for the new tenant. The only problem, he doesn’t seem to be anywhere. There is no food in his refrigerator. He has no mail to bring in. When she tries to clean the basement, the door is padlocked and bolted.

What kind of weirdo is this? He paid for his whole year lease upfront with cash sent from a rental agency that doesn’t even exist. Is he a criminal of some kind?

Cheryl need only turn to her cat. He likes to prowl around the place at night. He discovers wild goings on in the basement of the supernatural kind. The place is haunted to say the least by not by anything ordinary. An ancient evil inhabits the place. From the days of ancient Egypt and Greece comes a monster. If Cheryl doesn’t watch out, she soon will be dead.

Demon From Egypt was originally published in German by Cora Verlag. If you liked Demon From Egypt you will enjoy Dora Benley’s other ancient thrillers including Caesar and Cleopatra, Minotaur, Book of the Dead, Cleopatra’s Stone, and Helen of Troy.

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Helen of Troy And The Solar Eclipse of 2017:

What does Helen of Troy have to do with the solar eclipse of 2017? The novel Helen of Troy by Dora Benley was inspired by an earlier solar eclipse experienced by the author when writing the novel. It was so impressive that she included the eclipse in the first scene of the historical thriller. She was intrigued to depict the eclipse the way a Greek from the Mycenaean Age in the Bronze Age would think of it. It was a catastrophe brought on by the angry gods perhaps. Here is the beginning of the novel so you can see what Dora Benely was attempting to convey:

A black bull charged across the face of the sun and consumed it until only a halo could escape. Then the Goddess of Heaven passed, and it was daylight again. Old as I am now I can still remember the day the sky went black in Sparta. I had just turned sixteen summers in the moon of the first grape harvest when about midday the sun disappeared.

This is the age of the Mother Goddess when God was a She who had to be propitiated, and this one solar eclipse causes havoc in Helen’s home town of Sparta in ancient Greece.

So wherever you are in the United States on Monday, August 21 when you are viewing the Solar Eclipse of 2017 think of Helen of Troy in Sparta, a priestess of the Mother Goddess, being surprised by an ancient solar eclipse that prefaces all her adventures to come in Greece and Troy. Come and see it all through her eyes when you read the young adult thriller Helen of Troy.
As the Kirkus Reviews once said of this book: Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.

If you liked Helen of Troy, you will enjoy other novels by Dora Benley including the Salisbury Plot, Book of the Dead, Dark 3: Special Edition, Mary’s Gone, and Latin Lessons.

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Helen of Troy by Dora Benley Free On Amazon Kindle:
Helen of Troy by Dora Benley will be offered for sale for free starting on Sunday, May 21 and continuing through Thursday next week, May 25. This new young adult historical novel incorporates retells the myth of Helen of Troy and her husband Menelaus, King of Sparta, as they both confront the Trojan War. But hurry! This is a not to miss offer not to be repeated this year.
First-novelist Dora Benley recounts the fall of Troy from Helen’s point of view—in this spirited page-turner that placed in the National Writers Book Contest.
Though brought up to inherit the role of her mother, Queen Leda, as keeper of the ancient mother-goddess cult increasingly suppressed by the reigning kings, beautiful Helen of Sparta initially fails to hear the Goddess of Heaven’s voice within her. And no wonder—the hormone-bedeviled teen-ager lusts after handsome Meneleus, whose family has offended the Goddess by looting her temples for bronze. Upon Leda’s death, the Goddess offers Helen the choice of marrying Meneleus at the cost of a life of misery and the destruction of Sparta, or sacrificing him in favor of older, craggy-faced Odysseus—the “wisest among the Achaeans”—with whom Helen would enjoy a long, happy reign as Sparta’s queen. Naturally, Helen chooses Meneleus, and thus follows betrayals, misunderstandings, and intrigues that lead to the destruction of Sparta and Troy. Kidnapped by Paris, forced to marry him and bear sons by his cleverer brother, Deiphobus, Helen concentrates on protecting the hordes who worship her—whether as the Goddess on Earth in Sparta or as Inanna in Troy. Her efforts to play out the Goddess’s maternal role are at cross purposes with the male rulers’ ambitions, however—and constant misunderstandings result. Herding her subjects out of besieged Sparta, she is accused of abandoning her post. Refusing to abandon her Trojan sons when Meneleus arrives to rescue her, she commits treason. Then, attempting to free the Trojan people from their despotic rulers by allowing the Trojan horse within the city walls, she betrays her Trojan husband.
Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.

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