New Cover For Unlocking Trinity: The Sketch:

Daniel Teran has produced a sketch for the exciting new cover for Unlocking Trinity, a concluding novel of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series. Helga von Wessel, the femme fatale and villainess of the series, is riding an atomic bomb to her doom —- or at least so Edward Ware hopes.

The Ware’s little girl has been kidnapped by Hitler and forced to live with him at the Berghof. But when Hitler commits suicide in his Berlin Bunker on April 30, 1945, what happens to the child who has been indoctrinated as a Nazi, who has forgotten that English is her native language?

Her biological father, General Lord Edward Ware, must defy Eisenhower’s order to leave Berlin to the Russians. He must get to her before Stalin’s henchwoman does. It becomes a race to Trinity in the wilds of New Mexico in the birth trauma of the Cold War.

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Roman Army More Destructive Than Atomic Bomb:

We read about Scipio Aemilianus, head of the Roman army, weeping at the end of the Third Punic War as he stood by the historian, Polybius, and supervised the systemic burning and destruction of Carthage. The last 50,000 citizens presented an olive branch to the Roman army and marched out of the doomed city to a life of slavery. Aemilianus quoted Homer about Troy. But Oppenheimer on July 16, 1945 when he watched the first nuclear explosion quoted Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become Death, the Destroyer of Worlds”. The atomic bomb is supposed to be the ultimate weapon destroying more than anything else. But really the Roman army at Carthage after the Third Punic War destroyed more —- and they didn’t even have guns or explosives at all!

Rome  and the Roman army took apart a whole civilization and obliterated all traces of it. Nothing survived for very long, not even the art or culture after the last ruler of Carthage committed suicide and his wife threw her children into the flames and then leaped into the flames herself. But after World War 1 and World War 2 the defeated parties not only survived but prospered and in very short order, too. The United States and Britain didn’t burn all the German cities to the ground and enslave whole populations. Germany and Japan came right back after the war and became economic engines again. Rome and the Roman army would never have permitted this with Carthage.

We are commemorating the 100th anniversary of World War 1. Europe cannot get over the Battle of the Somme and other similar battles losing thousands of men. But Rome and the Roman army suffered more during the Second Punic War, especially during the Battle of Cannae, and got over it very quickly. Nor did it make Rome hate war and want to avoid it at all costs.

This attitude that somehow the past was more peaceful and the present more violent needs to be re-examined. It doesn’t fit the facts. The Punic Wars seem more horrible than either World War 1 or World War 2.

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