Murder At Hamlet’s Castle:

Dora Benley has authored the 12th volume of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series, and they are still coming adding more volumes. In the future look for more adventures including upcoming Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Edward and Dora are always looking for places to conceal the much sought after Lawrence maps. They have hidden them everywhere from the Rosetta Stone at the British Museum, to the floorboards beneath the bedroom at Edward’s estate in the south of England, to Dora’s bedroom in Oakhurst outside Pittsburgh during the First World War, to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains outside Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the Rose Tree Museum in Tombstone, Arizona, at Winston Churchill’s estate, Chartwell in Kent, in the tent at Petra in the Syrian desert while fighting with Lawrence of Arabia, and up Edward’s sleeve everywhere he goes as a Colonel in His Majesty’s Armed Forces.

Why shouldn’t the much fabled maps be associated with Hamlet? Apparently in the bowels of Kronburg Castle in Helsingor, or Elsinore in the play, the Danish Prince constructed a vast storage area where he was storing military supply equipment and secret plans and maps for conquering the enemy named Fortinbras whom his father, the previous king of Denmark, was trying to defeat. The castle fell into ruins and very few people remembered the secret chamber. Winston Churchill chanced upon information about it in his researches to European history, and of course Hamlet was a real prince and not just the fictional creation of Shakespeare’s imagination.

So Dora and Edward decide to hide the Lawrence maps there thinking that no one will find them. But that was in the 1930’s. What happens when the Nazi overrun Denmark? Dora and Edward had better get those maps out of there quickly or there will be hell to pay for all of Europe and the civilized world. To be or not to be? They won’t get the chance when Hitler invades. They just won’t be and neither will Denmark.

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How About This For An Edward Ware Thrillers Plot?

Dora and Edward have traveled to some strange places in their career of hiding the Lawrence maps and keeping them away from Hitler’s spies. They even had a stint where they were hiding the maps in Hamlet’s Castle in Elsinore, Denmark. This travel plot should be right up their alley.

Start in Tucson, Arizona and drive east in an indirect fashion. Perhaps you travel north to Yellowstone first. Why not? Dora and Edward just had a Yellowstone plot, too, in Old Faithful Plot. Travel directly east on I-90 or I-80 which didn’t exist at that point. Perhaps use the Lincoln Highway instead, again featured in Old Faithful Plot. Go all the way through to New York, perhaps stopping in Dora’a hometown of Pittsburgh first.

Board the QM2 (in those days the original Queen Mary) and sail across the ocean blue to England to Southampton. There they could meet with Churchill in the Churchill Room on the ship where you can smoke cigars and figure out what to do next. From there they could stop in Hamburg and visit the nautical bookstore with which they have become familiar. Why? He is an operative, of course, in Nazi Germany just like Putlitz, ace of double spies.

From there it is onward to Elsinore in Denmark with Hamlet’s Castle facing you in the dock. No doubt here Edward and Dora want to take a shore excursion to deposit those valuable Lawrence maps in the basement where Danish troops used to be billeted in the Middle Ages during the time of Hamlet.

From there it is homeward bound. First they have to stop in Oslo, Norway of all places. Don’t you think by now they should have earned a Nobel Prize for all their efforts? After that they must return to Hamburg without the Lawrence maps, of course, since they are lunching with Hitler. In Southampton they meet with Churchill and toast with champagne for a job well done. Then they return to New York.

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Hamlet v. Fortinbras: The Real Conflict Of Hamlet:

Yes, people think that gloomy, cloudy, rainy weather where you rarely see the sun would be ideal for Hamlet. This certainly fits Shakespeare’s hero, but what if there were an historic Hamlet who was different? It might not be ideal for him. After all, Hamlet’s kingdom, poised on the sea with Sweden only miles away across the straits where Fortinbras ruled, was under siege and attack. (I think it makes more sense than having Fortinbras be from Norway). That might have been the real reason that Hamlet’s father had been killed instead of an incestuous murder plot on the part of his uncle who wanted to marry Hamlet’s mother. And of course the prince has to take over for his father and fight Fortinbras who is the real enemy of the piece instead of just some foreign monarch who wanders on the stage at the end and finds the Danish court all dead. In other words someone should have written the famous tragedy as the conflict between Hamlet and Fortinbras.

Another important point is that Hamlet is obviously a Viking type. Fortinbras would also be a Viking. They would live in a world of warfare by sea. If Shakespeare were true to type, he would have the Danish Prince from Elsinore revving up his long boats. Supposedly a more recent author named John Updike tried his hand at the story. He more recently wrote a novel called Gertrude and Claudius emphasizing the Viking the connection.

These new conflicts and perspectives are all incorporated in the upcoming Cheops Books LLC historical thriller, Murder at Hamlet’s Castle.

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Hamlet-Like Weather in Helsingor, Denmark:

Even in midsummer Scandanavia seems to be a bit nippy to say the least. It reminds me a little of the weather in Newport, Oregon on the Pacific Northwest Coast in the summer time.  I have been looking up the weather in Helsingor, Denmark now for several weeks on a daily basis in June and J. I am trying to get a feel for it. That is one of the important settings of my novel Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Kronborg Castle, or Hamlet’s Castle, is in Helsingor, or Elsinore. The highs seem to always be in the 60’s and the lows are in the 50’s. It does rain some days. It is frequently cloudy, and seems to be the perpetually gloomy type of climate ideal for Hamlet.

Nor does Helsingor seem to have many distractions the way Newport, Oregon does. Newport has a beach. Perhaps Helsingor does, too, but I wonder. I have not heard it mentioned. Perhaps Hamlet’s town is just too far north for that sort of thing. Newport, Oregon also features the Oregon State Aquarium with whales and all sorts of sea creatures and birds that inhabit the Pacific Northwest Coast. I don’t think Helsingor has that sort of thing either. The most I have heard about are shops that sell Danish pastries and various kinds of folk cooking. That sounds more like Europe. Perhaps they can whip up a dish that even Hamlet would like to eat.

Murder at Hamlet’s Castle will soon be published by Cheops Books LLC.

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