New Cover For Murder at Hamlet’s Castle:

What do you think of the brand new cover for Murder at Hamlet’s Castle? You can find it on the book page on the website

http://www.edwardwarethrillers.org. After narrowly escaping the von Wessels, Hitler’s chief spies, in Santa Fe while on leave from Mid East Quarters in Cairo, Edward and Dora don’t know where to go next and where to hide the Lawrence maps, key to world domination. They have just been watching a production of Hamlet when they get a note from Winston Churchill. He says that he and Clemmie got locked in the dungeon of Hamlet’s Castle in Helsingor, Denmark. It was where the Danish army used to be billeted in the Middle Ages. They had to raise Hamlet’s ghost screaming to be let out. It just occurred to Winston it would be a perfect location to hide the much sought after military maps. No one would ever suspect they were there — and if they did they would never be able to escape with their lives let alone the prize that Hitler has been seeking for years.

But after a huge chase scene to get away from states they meet unexpected obstacles in the castle in 1934. The mistress who keeps the place up turns out to be the perfect Nazi spy in cahoots with Hitler and the von Wessels. Once again they need to escape. But this time they meet an unexpected ally in the famous Dane himself, Shakespeare’s most famous character. They uncover Hamlet’s secret notebooks that tell them just what they need to know. Others were cornered in this castle long ago. Hamlet tells them how he escaped in a tale that upsets all previous notions of the man, his character, and his fate.
Murder at Hamlet’s Castle by Dora Benley will be published soon by Cheops Books LLC.

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Is This Hamlet’s Ship? A Viking Reconstruction:

A couple of years ago there was an exhibition at the British Museum on the Viking culture. I bought the book that went with the exhibit called Vikings: Life and Legend by Gareth Williams, Peter Penz, and Matthias Wemhoff. It sounded interesting. I wish I could have seen it. Too bad they don’t put the exhibitions online the way they do with the permanent collection! But at least I was able to order a copy. Little did I know then that I would be writing a novel about Hamlet, who must have been a Viking or at least a descendant of Vikings in Denmark.

Fortinbras, whether he was the king of Norway or of Sweden right across the straits from Helsingor or Elsinore, obviously had a superior naval force or he would not be attacking and invading. He had probably already killed King Hamlet, Prince Hamlet’s father, in battle. Now Fortinbras was almost certainly after Hamlet, too, and Hamlet knew it. Was he going into battle like his father or was he going to escape somehow? Either way he would obviously have to get out one of his long boats, Viking style. We have pictured here in the blog post a reconstruction of just such a Viking long boat. It is a reconstruction of Skuldelev, which must have been a famous Viking ship. It is from the British Museum exhibition.

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Hamlet v. Fortinbras: The Real Conflict Of Hamlet:

Yes, people think that gloomy, cloudy, rainy weather where you rarely see the sun would be ideal for Hamlet. This certainly fits Shakespeare’s hero, but what if there were an historic Hamlet who was different? It might not be ideal for him. After all, Hamlet’s kingdom, poised on the sea with Sweden only miles away across the straits where Fortinbras ruled, was under siege and attack. (I think it makes more sense than having Fortinbras be from Norway). That might have been the real reason that Hamlet’s father had been killed instead of an incestuous murder plot on the part of his uncle who wanted to marry Hamlet’s mother. And of course the prince has to take over for his father and fight Fortinbras who is the real enemy of the piece instead of just some foreign monarch who wanders on the stage at the end and finds the Danish court all dead. In other words someone should have written the famous tragedy as the conflict between Hamlet and Fortinbras.

Another important point is that Hamlet is obviously a Viking type. Fortinbras would also be a Viking. They would live in a world of warfare by sea. If Shakespeare were true to type, he would have the Danish Prince from Elsinore revving up his long boats. Supposedly a more recent author named John Updike tried his hand at the story. He more recently wrote a novel called Gertrude and Claudius emphasizing the Viking the connection.

These new conflicts and perspectives are all incorporated in the upcoming Cheops Books LLC historical thriller, Murder at Hamlet’s Castle.

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Hamlet-Like Weather in Helsingor, Denmark:

Even in midsummer Scandanavia seems to be a bit nippy to say the least. It reminds me a little of the weather in Newport, Oregon on the Pacific Northwest Coast in the summer time.  I have been looking up the weather in Helsingor, Denmark now for several weeks on a daily basis in June and J. I am trying to get a feel for it. That is one of the important settings of my novel Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Kronborg Castle, or Hamlet’s Castle, is in Helsingor, or Elsinore. The highs seem to always be in the 60’s and the lows are in the 50’s. It does rain some days. It is frequently cloudy, and seems to be the perpetually gloomy type of climate ideal for Hamlet.

Nor does Helsingor seem to have many distractions the way Newport, Oregon does. Newport has a beach. Perhaps Helsingor does, too, but I wonder. I have not heard it mentioned. Perhaps Hamlet’s town is just too far north for that sort of thing. Newport, Oregon also features the Oregon State Aquarium with whales and all sorts of sea creatures and birds that inhabit the Pacific Northwest Coast. I don’t think Helsingor has that sort of thing either. The most I have heard about are shops that sell Danish pastries and various kinds of folk cooking. That sounds more like Europe. Perhaps they can whip up a dish that even Hamlet would like to eat.

Murder at Hamlet’s Castle will soon be published by Cheops Books LLC.

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Chapter 7: Wall Street Swastika: Poor Ophelia
The next morning they went to the first class dining room for breakfast. Nervously Dora looked from side to side. She didn’t see any of the creepy German spies who had haunted them yesterday evening at dinner. Had they all decamped when Edward made the rogue who attacked her walk the plank? Did they want to avoid trouble? Had they been waiting for that ship that had been shadowing them to escape? Had Hitler sent it? Were they on their way to Germany right now?
Dora did not feel comfortable sitting in the dining room where last night they had encountered the rogues. Rita had sent her excuses that she was having breakfast in her cabin. But Dora had to sit there and endure it. Winston always insisted on having a full breakfast pefectly cooked. He said it was the only way to start the day. He had to have his wits about him, and his wits had to be carefully nourished.
He and Edward sat there discussing of all things the Lawrence maps themselves. Edward had them right now up his sleeve. Before the voyage was over they were supposed to rendezvous with Churchill’s best friend, Professor Lindemann of Oxford. The gentleman was aboard the ship right now. Winston was pretending he did not know the man. If they saw him they were not to say hello or wave. In fact, he was sitting across the room right now. Dora turned to see him reading the newspapers all by himself at a table next to the Roman pillar near the kitchen entrance. Waiters zoomed past the physics professor left and right and he did not eyeball one of them. Instead he seemed to be doing the crossword puzzle if Dora had to guess. He was marking things down on the newspaper itself.
“Do you have any word what the Dictator is up to right now since he got word of the crash?” Edward asked very low.
Churchill dug into his poached eggs on toast covered with heavenly hollandaise sauce with bacon on the side. Winston nodded. “I talked to Lindemann last night in secret in the men’s room on the lower level in the dark. He reported that Hitler isn’t wasting any time at all. His speaking engagements had been few and far between until last week. Germany is dependent upon short term loans in particular. The farmers are up in arms, one of Hitler’s bases of power to begin with. Others in the cities are starting to lose their jobs already.”
Dora shook her head. “But can’t they see that the stock market will recover one of these days?”
Edward sighed. “Not soon enough to keep the likes of the slippery footed Hitler out of power.”
“Hitler has been invited to the townhall in Nuremberg entitled Why Democracy Has Failed Germany: Time for a Change.” He sipped his hot chocolate.
Dora tapped her fingers nervously on the table.
“The Hugenberg Press is giving him an interview next week. He is going to emphasize how the Nazis never had anything to do with the Weimar government. He even has his eye on two posts in the Thuringian government. He wants to aim at the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Education. That way he can control the civil service, the police, and the schools. He says he can do anything after that.”
Dora could not believe this nightmare just because of a bad day of Wall Street. All right. A terrible day. But she had to remember that not everybody had her father’s money.
That evening they were going to meet Lindemann in the theater aboard the ship. Once the lights went out they were going to hand over the maps. That was another clever move by Winston.
Dora had gotten there first. She was saving the four seats near the stage. The Royal Shakespearian Theater was putting on Hamlet. Ophelia was about to be buried in a church yard near the castle in Helsingor.
Suddenly a strange man sat down next to Dora. She rose immediately, but he grabbed her by the hand. She did not know whether to scream and attract everybody’s attention. After all, she had the maps in her handbag.
She did not get a chance to think. The lights had just gone out. He slipped his hand over her mouth and put a gun to her back. She was forced to accompany him up the back staircase to the stage. Whatever he was up to she could not imagine. There was a wooden box that resembled a coffin. He was forcing her to climb into it.
No sooner had she laid down than stage hands picked up the coffin and carried her right out into the middle of the stage. The players were declaiming all around her in Act V, Scene 1 of Hamlet. The gravediggers are arguing with each other whether she should be buried here since she committed suicide.
Hamlet and Horatio enter stage left. They are talking about the various graves. Hamlet finds a skull he likes but says in a voice that sounds a bit too familiar to Dora, “Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him Horatio!” Why, that sounded like Edward! Or was it her imagination? Had they seen her get kidnapped? Had they sensed an elaborate plot afoot for stealing the maps in the middle of the play?
Suddenly Hamlet sees her coffin. He breaks into lamentations. He claims that he would eat a crocodile for Ophelia or even be buried alive with her. Laertes contradicts Hamlet in the voice of the thug who brought her up here to begin with. She hears Edward shove the thug aside as Claudius and Gertrude enter the stage and declare Hamlet mad. But Hamlet insists on leaning over the coffin of Ophelia and kissing her cheek. She has the maps ready and hands them to Edward.
The curtains close and Dora leaps up out of the coffin of Ophelia. Churchill is stage left calling to her along with Edward still dressed as Hamlet next to the real players who look totally befuddled as Edward, Churchill, and Dora flee the theater to take the elevator to their rooms where Professor Lindemann waits. Dora falls into Edward’s arms. It was another narrow escape.

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William Shakespeare is not only the most famous English writer of all times, he is frequently considered to be the greatest writer who ever existed in the whole world. But did he really exist? Was his name really William Shakespeare? Or was Shakespeare merely a pen name to conceal his real identity? There was a William Shakespeare who was a businessman at the time, who bought New Place at Stratford upon Avon. But was he a patron of the artists or a writer? Did the real writer just borrow his name? And why did he want to conceal himself? In the past people have suggested that he might have been close to the royal court and thus wanted not to be known for political reasons. But whoever he was the mystery he leaves behind is intriguing and has become the subject of the upcoming Edward Ware Thrillers novel, Murder at Hamlet’s Castle.

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Edward Ware Thrillers Newsletter December 2016
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to All.

Christmas Special:
Would you like an audio book version of Captive at the Berghof: Part 1 or Part 2 or perhaps Dark Horse? Would you like to find out if the Wares get their daughter, Thomasina, back from Hitler? Or how the election of 1940 turns out in the alternative history scenario of Dark Horse? If so Cheops Books LLC has a free giveaway for the first fifteen people to respond. Use the Contact us form on the website to let us know your preference. We will give you the code you need to check it out for free on Audible.

All Cheops Books LLC titles are for sale as Kindle ebooks on Amazon.com. But they are not available on Amazon as paperbacks. Starting in 2017 you will be able to get paperback editions of selected books right on our website. You will see that a BUY NOW button has been inserted next to the lucky title chose for this promotion. You will be able to buy the titles using your PayPal account. Or if you wish you will be able to buy selected paperbacks on lulu.com.

Purchase Dark Horse from Cheops Books:

Even selected ebooks will be available on lulu.com as an alternative to Amazon if you prefer.
Pack your bags for Denmark in the New Year. That is what Dora and Edward must do when they are attacked during a Shakespeare performance and must flee and hide the Lawrence maps in a place of ill omen, Hamlet’s Castle in Elsinore. Look for Murder at Hamlet’s Castle, coming soon from Cheops Books, LLC.

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Denmark is not a land of castles. Perhaps it is too flat. We usually think of castles sitting up on hills or at least hillocks. England has far more spooky medieval edifices. But Denmark has at least one very infamous castle by the name of Kronborg in the town of Helsingor by the sea. It is about one hour from Copenhagen and promises all sorts of spooky adventures to anyone brave enough to enter the doors and visit where Hamlet once roamed and Hamlet’s ghost once haunted the stone walls. Cheops Books LLC will visit Kronborg in the upcoming thriller Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Hopefully it will sell as many copies as Dan Brown.

kronborg_set_fra_soesiden_-foto_thomas_rahbek_kronborg

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