Hamlet Is A Big Subject For Dora Benley:

Dora Benley not only likes to write novels about ancient Rome and Greece, she is also fond of Shakespeare and Hamlet. Two of her recent novels have concerned themselves with Hamlet. Just last week she published the YA thriller Ophelia Plot about a girl who was kidnapped while she was putting on Hamlet on the high school stage. Yet to be published is the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Dora and Edward are attending a performance of Hamlet when they get a note from Churchill. They have to make their way to Hamlet’s Castle in Denmark where they are supposed to hide the Lawrence maps.

After narrowly escaping the von Wessels, Hitler’s chief spies, in Santa Fe while on leave from Mid East Quarters in Cairo, Edward and Dora don’t know where to go next and where to hide the Lawrence maps, key to world domination. They have just been watching a production of Hamlet when they get a note from Winston Churchill. He says that he and Clemmie got locked in the dungeon of Hamlet’s Castle in Helsingor, Denmark. It was where the Danish army used to be billeted in the Middle Ages. They had to raise Hamlet’s ghost screaming to be let out. It just occurred to Winston it would be a perfect location to hide the much sought after military maps. No one would ever suspect they were there — and if they did they would never be able to escape with their lives let alone the prize that Hitler has been seeking for years.

But after a huge chase scene to get away from states they meet unexpected obstacles in the castle in 1934. The mistress who keeps the place up turns out to be the perfect Nazi spy in cahoots with Hitler and the von Wessels. Once again they need to escape. But this time they meet an unexpected ally in the famous Dane himself, Shakespeare’s most famous character. They uncover Hamlet’s secret notebooks that tell them just what they need to know. Others were cornered in this castle long ago. Hamlet tells them how he escaped in a tale that upsets all previous notions of the man, his character, and his fate.

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