The Roman Banquet In Classical Times:

The second day of the Roman wedding was often a Roman banquet or reception for the guests which meant feasting. What did the Romans eat?
You might be likely to find them gathered on the couches and sofas around the banqueting table devouring a pork roast the way you would associate with Henry VIII. For the Roman aristocracy liked pork as much as the later day English aristocracy. But alas they did not have forks, which were an invention of later times. They had to content themselves with only spoons and knives. And more than their modern counterparts they ate with their hands.

If they were not serving pork they would probably be serving fish, which was a favorite of Romans. They had their own favorite fish sauce, too. It was called either garum or liquamen. It has often be compared with American ketchup in its popularity.

And what about dessert for the Roman banquet? For the wedding banquet you were not likely to be served a wedding cake. In fact in the aristocratic form of marriage that was reserved for the bridal couple only during the ceremony and was fed to them by the priest in a ceremony resembling what later became the Roman Catholic wedding ceremony. But they were likely to enjoy fruit, honey, and nuts mixed up in some kind of custard or even cookies. And while they ate they were likely to be entertained by jugglers, musicians, acrobats, and actors.

In Julia: A Romance by Dora Benley, and soon to be published by Cheops Books LLC,  you will find a full-scale banquet after the wedding ceremony. This all takes place before Julia and Marcus Sisenna, the groom, depart for a mysterious honeymoon trip to Greece where they will meet untold adventures.

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Should We Throw Henry VIII Out Of The History Books?:

Should we throw Henry VIII and other wrong doers out of the history books? This is one of the questions evoked by recent incidents in Charlotteseville, Virginia concerning pulling down the Robert E. Lee statue.

You have to see things in their historical context. Everyone is limited by the times in which he happens to live. For instance, are we supposed to tear down classic buildings like the Pantheon in Rome because it was originally built by Agrippa who was Augustus’s friend and a slaveholder? The Pantheon was rebuilt later by Hadrian who was also a slaveholder. Should we tear down Hadrian’s Villa as well as the Pantheon because the builders and rebuilders were slaveholders? I don’t think Italian tourism would go for that.

There is the famous example of Wagner and his operas? He might not have been played in Israel but nobody has suggested you should destroy his operas because his wife associated with Hitler and because he himself in the 19th century espoused the early doctrines of what later became National Socialism?

What about Henry VIII? Should we tear down Hampton Court because he abused women? The list goes on and on.

The University of Virginia library said by the way that America could not have existed without black slavery. Apparently the slaves were the only workers who could have survived in the fields in the south where there was still malaria and other tropical diseases. It was morally bad but a necessity all the same. It was the choice of Dostoevsky’s Grand Inquisitioner from The Brothers Karamazov, a dark choice but one that was to lead eventually to the United States of America without whom the Nazis would not have been defeated in the twentieth century. History is neither moral nor immoral. It is amoral.

Many of the novels published by Cheops Books LLC are historical novels such as the  upcoming Vesuvius Plot, The Cherusci Plot, and The Inn at the Crossroads.

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Edward Ware Thrillers at War in History:

Edward Ware Thrillers at War discusses themes of British and German history. I don’t think England ever had anything like the Thirty Years War in Germany, the big bad religious war between Catholics and Protestants that according to Gary made WW1 and WW2 look like a picnic by comparison. The Thirty Years War left more people dead than the Black Death. It was the worst war in German history by far. Henry VIII was pretty bad but he wasn’t as bad as the Thirty Years War with all his monastery burning, etc. In fact England has been pretty dominant in Europe since the days of the Tudors, certainly since the days of the Glorious Revolution. And England was where the Industrial Revolution started in the 18th century. England obviously had more colonies than anybody else and a much bigger Empire, too. Even at the beginning of WW1 there were articles in American newspapers about the British Navy off the coast of North America PROTECTING US. People in the US felt safe with Great Britain there.

Then came WW1 and WW2, and we know the story. Since that takes us to the present era, we can’t say what will be the next chapter for England. But it has the strange and unusual advantage of having its language be the dominant one in the world. Also the US speaks English. Britain is allowed all sorts of special advantages in Europe because of its relationship with the US. The Germans will go only so far because of this. But in a sense I think it is the Germans, not the Russians, who are still the real opposition to the US and to England despite the fact that they have almost no armed forces.

Germany was the home of both Communism and Facism. I think East Germany was propping up the whole Soviet Union somehow. Hitler and Stalin were playing at dividing up Eastern Europe. More recently Merkel and Putin came up with some natural gas or oil or both agreement which is what Poland doesn’t like because it remembers the days of Stalin and Hitler. Putin speaks German. He feels comfortable in Germany and the Netherlands. So did Peter the Great of Russia who tried to model St. Petersburg on Amsterdam. Germany has been a big influence in Russia for a long time. Catherine the Great came from Germany and was originally Lutheran. There is something going on between Russia and Germany that has been percolating for centuries. Just remember the extreme leftist riots that greeted Trump a few weeks ago in Hamburg.

Also Germany since the mid 19th century has been expanding and trying to create an empire. My mother had a book from college called Germany Will Try It Again about a theme of modern German history. That is why I say they are the real enemy.

These are the themes that controlled the race to find the Lawrence maps, key to world domination, that are featured in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series. Will it be the Germans under the Kaiser or Hitler? Or will it be the British and Americans under Churchill and Roosevelt? The battle continues to the present day.

Turn the page and find out what happens next.

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