Livia: A Novel Starts 5 Day Promotion:

Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley starts a five day free promotion on Amazon Kindle today. Get the historical thriiller about ancient Rome for free now. But hurry! An offer this good won’t be repeated this year.

Livia has just returned from her search to find her fiance, Octavius, heir of Julius Casesar, in the wake of Caesar’s assassination. Octavius has fled Rome, and she was trying to save his life. She gets captured by pirates for all her trouble. When she finally catches up with her fiance she can no longer marry him. She learns that her own family, the Claudians, were behind Julius Caesar’s assassination. She can be Octavius’s mistress and nothing more. A proud girl, she spurns the thought and figures she must give him up for good.
Livia describes herself in her diary at this sad impasse:

“I can just imagine what I looked like: long coils of black hair curled in ringlets plas­tered all over my face, my neck, my bosom, and my shoulders — pasted on by dried salt and brine. A red silk dress clinging to my figure and slipping down over one shoulder a bit too far. Here and there still a jeweled earring or ankle bracelet poking through as a sad legacy from my other life. Looking all together like a prow ornament that had been fished up from the depths after some long ago shipwreck.”

At this low point of her life Livia would be surprised to learn that she will somebody marry the man she loves and stay married to him for 52 years. It will become one of the most legendary matches in Roman history and one of the most historically important, too. Just how this comes about is the story of this piece of fiction: Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley, another one of this author’s ancient Greek and Roman novels. If you liked this story about ancient Rome for young adults, this novel about Livia and Augustus, you will also like Book of the Dead, Helen of Troy, Cleopatra’s Stone, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Julia: A Romance, Julius Caesar: A Novel, Medea the Witch, and Jason and Medea: A Novel.

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Livia: A Novel Free On Monday:

Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley will be free on Amazon Kindle starting Monday.

Livia has just returned from her search to find her fiance, Octavius, heir of Julius Caesar, in the wake of Caesar’s assassination. Octavius has fled Rome, and she was trying to save his life. She gets captured by pirates for all her trouble. When she finally catches up with her fiance she can no longer marry him. She learns that her own family, the Claudians, were behind Julius Caesar’s assassination. She can be Octavius’s mistress and nothing more. A proud girl, she spurns the thought and figures she must give him up for good.
Livia describes herself in her diary at this sad impasse:

“I can just imagine what I looked like: long coils of black hair curled in ringlets plas­tered all over my face, my neck, my bosom, and my shoulders — pasted on by dried salt and brine. A red silk dress clinging to my figure and slipping down over one shoulder a bit too far. Here and there still a jeweled earring or ankle bracelet poking through as a sad legacy from my other life. Looking all together like a prow ornament that had been fished up from the depths after some long ago shipwreck.”

At this low point of her life Livia would be surprised to learn that she will somebody marry the man she loves and stay married to him for 52 years. It will become one of the most legendary matches in Roman history and one of the most historically important, too. Just how this comes about is the story of this piece of fiction: Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley, another one of this author’s ancient Greek and Roman novels.

If you liked this story about ancient Rome for young adults, this novel about Livia and Augustus, you will also like Book of the Dead, Helen of Troy, Cleopatra’s Stone, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Julia: A Romance, Julius Caesar: A Novel, Medea the Witch, and Jason and Medea: A Novel.

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Julius Caesar: A Novel Begins Five-Day Promotion:

Julius Caesar: A Novel begins a five-day promotion on Amazon Kindle. Get your copy for free. But hurry! An offer this good won’t be repeated this year.

In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire.

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Livia: A Novel May Soon Have A Second Edition:

Livia: A Novel may soon have a second edition. Watch this blog post and the website for announcements.

Livia has just returned from her search to find her fiance, Octavius, heir of Julius Casesar, in the wake of Caesar’s assassination. Octavius has fled Rome, and she was trying to save his life. She gets captured by pirates for all her trouble. When she finally catches up with her fiance she can no longer marry him. She learns that her own family, the Claudians, were behind Julius Caesar’s assassination. She can be Octavius’s mistress and nothing more. A proud girl, she spurns the thought and figures she must give him up for good.

Livia describes herself in her diary at this sad impasse:

“I can just imagine what I looked like: long coils of black hair curled in ringlets plas­tered all over my face, my neck, my bosom, and my shoulders — pasted on by dried salt and brine. A red silk dress clinging to my figure and slipping down over one shoulder a bit too far. Here and there still a jeweled earring or ankle bracelet poking through as a sad legacy from my other life. Looking all together like a prow ornament that had been fished up from the depths after some long ago shipwreck.”

At this low point of her life Livia would be surprised to learn that she will somebody marry the man she loves and stay married to him for 52 years. It will become one of the most legendary matches in Roman history and one of the most historically important, too. Just how this comes about is the story of this piece of fiction: Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley, another one of this author’s ancient Greek and Roman novels. If you liked this story about ancient Rome for young adults, this novel about Livia and Augustus, you will also like Book of the Dead, Helen of Troy, Cleopatra’s Stone, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Julia: A Romance, Julius Caesar: A Novel, Medea the Witch, and Jason and Medea: A Novel.

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Julius Caesar: A Novel Up For Promotion On Monday:

Julius Caesar: A Novel by Dora Benley will begin a five-day promotion on Amazon Kindle starting Monday.

In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire.

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Caesar and Cleopatra Starts Five-Day Promotion:

Caesar and Cleopatra by Dora Benley today begins a five-day promotion on Amazon Kindle. Download it for free. But hurry! An offer this good won’t be repeated this year.

This historical thriller by Dora Benley opens with Queen Cleopatra in exile roaming about the Sahara Desert with her serving women trying to survive. She is at war with her brother, King Ptolemy. Suddenly the famous Roman general, Julius Caesar, arrives in town and summons Cleopatra to Alexandria. The well educated, clever Cleopatra wants to make the best of a dangerous mission where she risks arrest and execution by her brother’s guards. She wants to make sure that the Great Man from Rome, Julius Caesar, Conqueror of half the world, is on her side before her brother Ptolemy can grab his ear.

The seventeen year old teenager concocts a scheme that will awaken Caesar’s sensibilities and appeal to him directly for his protection. She orders one of her servants to spirit her into Alexandria wrapped in a carpet. She is put down on the floor before Caesar.

“Very well, Queen Cleopatra, you can come out now,” Caesar commands. With a spring of the wrist, Caesar unrolls the carpets. She finds herself sitting on the floor gazing up into the blue-gray eyes of the Roman conqueror. Cleopatra imagined he would be a colossus with giant sinews and great stature like Hercules. But he is a tall man on the thinnish side with a balding head and goiter in late middle age with a perfectly proportioned bone structure and an aristocratic, firm mouth.

So begins the adventure of Caesar and Cleopatra.

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Carthage Must Be Destroyed Book Cover:

Carthage Must Be Destroyed is the latest in a series of historical thriller novels by Dora Benley about the long ago ancestors of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, or General Lord Edward Ware, of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series about World War 1 and World War 2. Colonel Ware lives outside Salisbury, England, of recent notoriety with the Russian chemical attacks. He lives at his estate called Ware Hall which has been inhabited by his family since Roman times when his ancestor Lucius Antonius fled to Britain after Julius Caesar was assassinated.

Cato the Elder ended every speech in the Roman Senate with the words, “Carthage must be destroyed.” He was a survivor of the Second Punic War fifty years before. Hannibal won the Battle of Cannae and almost marched on Rome itself. He reminded the Romans that Carthage had finished paying its reparations and was now refurbishing its navy. It could sail against them again just as Hannibal himself had crossed the Alps a generation before.

The son of another senator, Gaius Antonius, is picked by Cato to follow him to Carthage to assess the situation. Gaius Antonius sketches the harbor. His eyes light on a ship that is being built. It looks like the finest of its fleet.

When Cato orders the Carthaginians to send one hundred hostages picked from the youth of the noble families of Carthage to Rome to be kept at his latifundia estate, the Princess Tanit arrives. She tries to charm everyone —- for awhile. But soon she and the sketches and maps that Gaius Antonius drew suddenly disappear along with all the hostages.

This sets off a multi-nation chase to get the drawings and maps back again. Cato wants to show the drawing of the fine naval vessel and the threats it represents to the Roman Senate. They are on the verge of declaring war, and Cato and Gaius Antonius want to push them over the edge. Will they make it in time, or will the Carthaginians gain an advantage? Will Princess Tanit and her cohorts escape, or will they get their just deserts?

Find out. Read Carthage Must Be Destroyed coming soon from Cheops Books LLC. This is a sketch of the cover drawn by artist Daniel Teran.

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Trump Listened To Only Half Of Crassus’s Advice:

Marcus Licinius Crassus was friends with the greatest military general of all times, Gaius Julius Caesar. So he ought to know what he was talking about when he gave advice to Donald Trump in the White House. What were they talking about? Syria, of course, and how to respond to the recent chemical attack.

Crassus has been living at the White House in the Lincoln bedroom since early 2017 when he moved in for the first time in 2000 years. He liked Trump and wished him well. He was after all, another mogul, another businessman, who wanted to get involved in politics just like Crassus in the first century B.C. when the Republic was busting up and turning into the Empire.
Crassus reportedly told Trump to do something sneaky. How Trump got bogged down in having international organizations certify that the Syrian President was responsible for the chemical attack on civilians, no one can guess. Crassus had not doubt told him that such a technique would be good if he were trying to hide what he was really doing a la Julius Caesar style.

Caesar once pretended that he was withdrawing his troops from Alexandria. He had certain ships load up supplies and pretend to be sailing back to Rome. Instead of attacking the palace where Cleopatra’s brother was holed up, he decided to feast and make merry in the harbor, dining before all his troops. Cleopatra’s brother decided that Caesar was a coward and ordered a banquet in celebration. After all the Egyptian troops got drunk, then Caesar attacked the Palace and took it with hardly a Roman casualty.

How could Trump emulate that? Well, after he called an international body into Syria and everybody thought he was too cowardly to attack by himself, he should order an air strike in Iran because they are helping to support the corrupt Syrian regime. Or perhaps he should even try to use a smart bomb to get Putin himself in his marble palace hidden away from view. That would be a biggie!

But if Trump has misinterpreted all his good advice from Crassus, it is very sad. But then American Presidents never were Roman generals, now were they?

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Cheops Books LLC Took Shore Excursion To Salisbury:

When Cheops Books LLC took the shore excursion in July of 2012 to Salisbury Cathedral and Stonehenge, the tour guide told us when we were coming into town in Salisbury about his memories of World War 2 as a little boy. He remembered being given candy by American and Canadian GI’s waiting to be shipped out for operations such as D-Day. He showed us where all the units were housed along the roads as we got closer and closer to Salisbury.

The tour guide did not mention chemical weapons factories outside of Salisbury, but what we suspect is that they must be north of town since south of town is the New Forest which we drove through and which is a national park. But we are sure they are there as you say.

The area around Salisbury has been from time immemorial a place to see the coming and going of armies in Britain from the time of the Romans and Julius Caesar to the time of William the Conqueror and onward to the present time. In fact the whole south coast of England along the Channel from Southampton to Dover is important from the strategic point of view. Dover Castle was actually used during WW2. The evacuation from Dunkirk was directed from the castle.

That is one of the reasons Cheops Books LLC chose Salisbury as the town nearest Ware Hall, home of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers At War Series. It is a military setting. He is in the military. All of his ancestors back to Roman times have been in the military, too.

Still that is no justification for the Russians to use chemical weapons there especially against civilians. Cheops Books LLC remembers that the town also had a medieval atmosphere. Salisbury Cathedral itself had such a medieval feel about it that it might as well have had knights in shining armor at the doors. It certainly had a lot of stained glass windows. All around town are bronze age burial mounds. What is now to happen to all of this?

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Did Edward Ware’s Ancestor Fight In The Punic Wars?

Colonel Sir Edward Ware is known to have quite a pedigree, at least as long as the Queen’s. He can trace his ancestry back to ancient Rome. His ancestor, Lucius Antonius, fought with Julius Caesar in the Alexandrian War. He was the grandfather of Caelius Antonius, mapmaker for the Roman legions who were massacred by ancient Germans at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

And Caelius Antonius was the grandfather of Caius Antonius, an assistant of the famous Latin encyclopedia writer, Pliny the Elder, who helped the famous essayist escape an attack of the Germans at the time of Vesuvius and Pompeii.

But before that farther back in the history of Rome did Colonel Sir Edward Ware have a Roman progenitor who fought against Hannibal in the Punic Wars? Believe it or not it may be so. Recently archaeological evidence indicates it. An early collection of documents yet to be completely translated has been found in a key location.

A Gaius Antonius —- same clan name as Edward —- was appointed by the Roman who later became the great victor, Scipio Africanus, to make drawings of what he saw in Carthage in the way of siege machines and weapons when visiting on the pretext of being an ambassador of sorts to Carthage. And where were these documents found? At the Punic Wall in the modern day Spanish city of Cartegena in southern Spain just across the straits from Africa and Carthage and not far from modern day Gibraltar.

The Punic Wall was what used to protect the ancient Carthagenian city in Spain. What story does this wall have to tell? These letters may tell us. Cheops Books LLC has just acquired the rights to translate them and reveal to the world their long hidden tale.

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