Carthage Must Be Destroyed Book Cover:

Carthage Must Be Destroyed is the latest in a series of historical thriller novels by Dora Benley about the long ago ancestors of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, or General Lord Edward Ware, of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series about World War 1 and World War 2. Colonel Ware lives outside Salisbury, England, of recent notoriety with the Russian chemical attacks. He lives at his estate called Ware Hall which has been inhabited by his family since Roman times when his ancestor Lucius Antonius fled to Britain after Julius Caesar was assassinated.

Cato the Elder ended every speech in the Roman Senate with the words, “Carthage must be destroyed.” He was a survivor of the Second Punic War fifty years before. Hannibal won the Battle of Cannae and almost marched on Rome itself. He reminded the Romans that Carthage had finished paying its reparations and was now refurbishing its navy. It could sail against them again just as Hannibal himself had crossed the Alps a generation before.

The son of another senator, Gaius Antonius, is picked by Cato to follow him to Carthage to assess the situation. Gaius Antonius sketches the harbor. His eyes light on a ship that is being built. It looks like the finest of its fleet.

When Cato orders the Carthaginians to send one hundred hostages picked from the youth of the noble families of Carthage to Rome to be kept at his latifundia estate, the Princess Tanit arrives. She tries to charm everyone —- for awhile. But soon she and the sketches and maps that Gaius Antonius drew suddenly disappear along with all the hostages.

This sets off a multi-nation chase to get the drawings and maps back again. Cato wants to show the drawing of the fine naval vessel and the threats it represents to the Roman Senate. They are on the verge of declaring war, and Cato and Gaius Antonius want to push them over the edge. Will they make it in time, or will the Carthaginians gain an advantage? Will Princess Tanit and her cohorts escape, or will they get their just deserts?

Find out. Read Carthage Must Be Destroyed coming soon from Cheops Books LLC. This is a sketch of the cover drawn by artist Daniel Teran.

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Trump Listened To Only Half Of Crassus’s Advice:

Marcus Licinius Crassus was friends with the greatest military general of all times, Gaius Julius Caesar. So he ought to know what he was talking about when he gave advice to Donald Trump in the White House. What were they talking about? Syria, of course, and how to respond to the recent chemical attack.

Crassus has been living at the White House in the Lincoln bedroom since early 2017 when he moved in for the first time in 2000 years. He liked Trump and wished him well. He was after all, another mogul, another businessman, who wanted to get involved in politics just like Crassus in the first century B.C. when the Republic was busting up and turning into the Empire.
Crassus reportedly told Trump to do something sneaky. How Trump got bogged down in having international organizations certify that the Syrian President was responsible for the chemical attack on civilians, no one can guess. Crassus had not doubt told him that such a technique would be good if he were trying to hide what he was really doing a la Julius Caesar style.

Caesar once pretended that he was withdrawing his troops from Alexandria. He had certain ships load up supplies and pretend to be sailing back to Rome. Instead of attacking the palace where Cleopatra’s brother was holed up, he decided to feast and make merry in the harbor, dining before all his troops. Cleopatra’s brother decided that Caesar was a coward and ordered a banquet in celebration. After all the Egyptian troops got drunk, then Caesar attacked the Palace and took it with hardly a Roman casualty.

How could Trump emulate that? Well, after he called an international body into Syria and everybody thought he was too cowardly to attack by himself, he should order an air strike in Iran because they are helping to support the corrupt Syrian regime. Or perhaps he should even try to use a smart bomb to get Putin himself in his marble palace hidden away from view. That would be a biggie!

But if Trump has misinterpreted all his good advice from Crassus, it is very sad. But then American Presidents never were Roman generals, now were they?

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Cheops Books LLC Took Shore Excursion To Salisbury:

When Cheops Books LLC took the shore excursion in July of 2012 to Salisbury Cathedral and Stonehenge, the tour guide told us when we were coming into town in Salisbury about his memories of World War 2 as a little boy. He remembered being given candy by American and Canadian GI’s waiting to be shipped out for operations such as D-Day. He showed us where all the units were housed along the roads as we got closer and closer to Salisbury.

The tour guide did not mention chemical weapons factories outside of Salisbury, but what we suspect is that they must be north of town since south of town is the New Forest which we drove through and which is a national park. But we are sure they are there as you say.

The area around Salisbury has been from time immemorial a place to see the coming and going of armies in Britain from the time of the Romans and Julius Caesar to the time of William the Conqueror and onward to the present time. In fact the whole south coast of England along the Channel from Southampton to Dover is important from the strategic point of view. Dover Castle was actually used during WW2. The evacuation from Dunkirk was directed from the castle.

That is one of the reasons Cheops Books LLC chose Salisbury as the town nearest Ware Hall, home of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers At War Series. It is a military setting. He is in the military. All of his ancestors back to Roman times have been in the military, too.

Still that is no justification for the Russians to use chemical weapons there especially against civilians. Cheops Books LLC remembers that the town also had a medieval atmosphere. Salisbury Cathedral itself had such a medieval feel about it that it might as well have had knights in shining armor at the doors. It certainly had a lot of stained glass windows. All around town are bronze age burial mounds. What is now to happen to all of this?

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Did Edward Ware’s Ancestor Fight In The Punic Wars?

Colonel Sir Edward Ware is known to have quite a pedigree, at least as long as the Queen’s. He can trace his ancestry back to ancient Rome. His ancestor, Lucius Antonius, fought with Julius Caesar in the Alexandrian War. He was the grandfather of Caelius Antonius, mapmaker for the Roman legions who were massacred by ancient Germans at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

And Caelius Antonius was the grandfather of Caius Antonius, an assistant of the famous Latin encyclopedia writer, Pliny the Elder, who helped the famous essayist escape an attack of the Germans at the time of Vesuvius and Pompeii.

But before that farther back in the history of Rome did Colonel Sir Edward Ware have a Roman progenitor who fought against Hannibal in the Punic Wars? Believe it or not it may be so. Recently archaeological evidence indicates it. An early collection of documents yet to be completely translated has been found in a key location.

A Gaius Antonius —- same clan name as Edward —- was appointed by the Roman who later became the great victor, Scipio Africanus, to make drawings of what he saw in Carthage in the way of siege machines and weapons when visiting on the pretext of being an ambassador of sorts to Carthage. And where were these documents found? At the Punic Wall in the modern day Spanish city of Cartegena in southern Spain just across the straits from Africa and Carthage and not far from modern day Gibraltar.

The Punic Wall was what used to protect the ancient Carthagenian city in Spain. What story does this wall have to tell? These letters may tell us. Cheops Books LLC has just acquired the rights to translate them and reveal to the world their long hidden tale.

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Cheops Books Offers Lots Of Roman Novels:

Historical novels like just about everything else started in ancient Rome with the publication of a series of Greek Hellenistic novels of the romantic sort. So in tribute to the people of the Tiber River who gave us the column, the arch, St. Peters, the Colosseum, and the Roman Forum, Cheops Books has published a series of thrillers about ancient Rome.

One such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire.

Another such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna. Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Marcus Sulla, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide. But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born. Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

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Is Socialism Better Than Private Enterprise?

You say that socialism means “sharing the burdens”. I am not sure what you mean by this, but if you mean offering more government programs and services at taxpayer expense, I guess that is where we should begin. BUT is the government really the best entity to offer these services? Do they offer the best quality services? I think NOT. Take the example of public education which is offered by the local and state government in America and by the national government in Paris, France for instance.

That is a good beginning point because it is a common service that we all share whether in America, Britain, or France. I have an MED in English Education which means master’s in English Education at the high school level. My mother was also a high school teacher. I did student teaching and even had a job teaching English for awhile. I came to the conclusion that no matter what they did, public education was always going to be second best. I went to a public grade school and high school. I didn’t learn very much there other than what I taught myself. But when I went to college, which was a private school, I learned much more. But public education remains because it is better than nothing, though it is a shocking burden at the local level because of local property taxes which support the schools.

The previous occupant of the White House was trying to expand the federal government’s reach into health care. All he succeeded in doing was to make it difficult to impossible for real people to buy health insurance plans. He made it so that you can’t even get a doctor to call you back on the phone since there is now a doctor shortage for no good reason except that he made it hard for doctors to have private practices anymore. Health care became second rate. Hopefully Trump’s tax bill which also included a provision to kill the mandate has started to change things.

Not that the government can’t do anything in regard to services. It would be hard to see how public highways could be private. it would be hard to see how the military could be private. However as a footnote, when armies WERE private back during the days of the late Roman Republic you had legendary and famous armies as well as the most famous general in history, Julius Caesar.

Cheops Books LLC publishes various Roman novels such as Livia: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Caesar’s Lost Legions, Pliny: A Novel, and Julia: A Romance.

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Julia Visits The Forum in Julia: A Romance:

One of the most perennial Roman monuments associated with the days of the Republic and Empire was the Roman Forum, or Forum Romanum in Latin. It was located in the valley between the Capitoline Hill and the Palatine Hill where all the aristocrats and the Emperor lived. This was the central meeting place of the city where the Senate House was located as well as numerous shops. Triumphal processions were held here by conquering generals. This was where Roman citizens came to vote for candidates for office. Public speeches were also held here where everyone gathered around to listen. It was the site of criminal trials even those politically motivated such as Catiline. Even gladiatorial matches could be held here. And nearby and convenient to the Forum were the Circus Maximus and the Colosseum. And important temples such as the Temple to the Vestal Virgins were nearby.

In the romantic historic thriller Julia: A Romance, the heroine makes many trips to the Forum and through the Forum in her efforts to evade either her evil, interfering mother, Octavia, or the man who wants to marry her at all costs, Marcus Sisenna, the second most powerful man in Rome. It is also a good place to hide since it was so crowded. It is part of the color of such novels that they are set against the backdrop of such historic settings where the likes of Juliius Caesar and Augustus Caesar walked.

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Democracy, Initiative, And Referendum:

In a democracy laws are made by majority voting BUT only on certain issues. First of all, it is a representative democracy. You cede your right to vote on every issue to your congressman and senators. Other issues you cede to the courts to decide and still other issues you cede to the President and the executive branch. Theoretically Congress could hold another Constitutional Convention and decide that individual states have the right to secede from the Union. But nothing short of that could authorize it including the courts. The courts themselves don’t have the power.

If you have a democracy that can VOTE to “come apart” on some whim, you have created an unstable structure that sounds more like mob rule than a true democracy. In such a society freedom of the press itself becomes dangerous because it is subject to “yellow journalism” and forces that try to influence your vote. The average person might vote for things for which he would be sorry later or for which he doesn’t realize the consequences.

I think Europe ought to get over this referendum stuff, which is something you cannot do in the US. I thought you yourself had decided that you were tired of votes and referendums. Look what problems they have caused in Britain in only a couple of years! In Spain they would cause even more problems.

Where did all this referendum stuff come from anyway? I don’t think Napoleon held referendums. The Romans certainly didn’t.
There is no way to talk about Calexit and be serious. It is a satiric, humorous subject. I have taken up blogging about the subject and in many of my blogs to show you have satiric it is, I have Trump accompanied by Marcus Crassus, the Roman billionaire and financier of Julius Caesar. He was a member of the First Triumvirate. He lost big at the Battle of Carrhae in Parthia and learned a lot to tell Trump. He accompanies Trump to California and advises him about how to conquer it while criticizing all the Roman baubles and costumes on a back lot in the Hollywood studios. That sort of thing.

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The German Question In Literature:

You may have hit upon a very central conflict in European history. Germany was not largely occupied by the Romans and from the time of the Romans you have the “German question”. The Romans wrote about it themselves. There is a lost work by Pliny the Elder, the author of the Natural History, probably called the Germania, and I make much of this in one of my novels. His nephew, Pliny the Younger, wrote about the subject, too. And Pliny the Younger’s friend, Tacitus, wrote the only surviving work on the subject entitled the Germania for sure. Tacitus’s work was the subject of the fascinating audio book I listened to on the subject at the beginning of last year.

Tacitus’s Germania has been a subject of discussion for the past two thousand years. It is the earliest work we have on the habits and customs of the early pagan Germans which emphasizes their warlike qualities and the “German question”. The Romans themselves were scared of them. No wonder! During the ugly Battle of the Teutoburg Forest Roman legionaries were captured in wooden cages and burned alive in the forest, sacrificed to pagan gods.

Richard Wagner during the 19th century made much of this ancient and medieval heritage in his operas. Heinrich Himmler was later to try to seize upon this material as the “origin” of what he called the Nazi identity.

I have looked up various works on Roman Britain on Amazon and curiously enough the British archaeologists have all noted that the British attitude about Rome differs from the attitude of France and Germany, and this influences their attitude about the “German question”. In France they celebrate Vercingetorix from Caesar’s Gallic Wars. He is supposed to be a national hero in France. In Germany they celebrate Herman the German, or Arminius. In Britain they celebrate the Romans. As many have noted, Britain seems to take on the identity of Rome itself. It all comes from the days of the British Empire and Imperial Britain. Nobody else on the Continent has anything like this and so recently, too! They look dubiously upon rebels against Rome such as Vercingetorix and Arminius.

It has also been said that the British have a better attitude about preserving ruins than they do in Italy. So the Roman ruins in Britain are better preserved than their Italian counterparts. You can get a better feel for the Roman world there including all those villas and mosaic floors that are much talked about.

Cheops Books LLC has two upcoming works about the “German question”. The concern Roman Britain and the ancient Germans battling the Romans: Pliny: A Novel and Caesar’s Legions, both works in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series.

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Livia: A Novel On Free Promotion

Livia: A Novel will be on free promotion on Amazon Kindle for the next five days starting tomorrow, Tuesday, August 1. It is still another in a line of Greek and Roman novels for young adults by Dora Benley. But hurry! The promotion will not be repeated this year. Enjoy the new cover by Jean-Baptiste Wicar, a painting from the Art Institute of Chicago.

In Livia: A Novel, Livia has just returned from her search to find her fiance, Octavius, heir of Julius Caesar, in the wake of Caesar’s assassination. Octavius has fled Rome, and she was trying to save his life. She gets captured by pirates for all her trouble. When she finally catches up with her fiance she can no longer marry him. She learns that her own family, the Claudians, were behind Julius Caesar’s assassination. She can be Octavius’s mistress and nothing more. A proud girl, she spurns the thought and figure she must give him up for good.

Livia describes herself in her diary at this sad impasse:

“I can just imagine what I looked like: long coils of black hair curled in ringlets plas­tered all over my face, my neck, my bosom, and my shoulders — pasted on by dried salt and brine. A red silk dress clinging to my figure and slipping down over one shoulder a bit too far. Here and there still a jeweled earring or ankle bracelet poking through as a sad legacy from my other life. Looking all together like a prow ornament that had been fished up from the depths after some long ago shipwreck.”

At this low point of her life Livia would be surprised to learn that she will somebody marry the man she loves and stay married to him for 52 years. It will become one of the most legendary matches in Roman history and one of the most historically important, too. Just how this comes about is the story of this piece of fiction: Livia: A Novel by Dora Benley, another one of this author’s ancient Greek and Roman novels. If you liked this story about ancient Rome for young adults, this novel about Livia and Augustus, you will also like Book of the Dead, Helen of Troy, Cleopatra’s Stone, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Julia: A Novel, Julius Caesar: A Novel, Medea the Witch, and Jason and Medea: A Novel.

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