New Cover For Armistice Plot:

Cheops Books LLC is working with a cover artist by the name of Daniel Teran to design a new cover for the upcoming historical thriller Armistice Plot. It is to be published next November 11, 2018, the one hundredth anniversary of the end of the First World War, World War 1, or the Great War.

We have settled on a cover design. We are going to have a picture of October 1, 1918, the day when Damascus fell to the British under Colonel T. E. Lawrence and General Allensby. T.E. Lawrence will be depicted driving into the Syrian capital of Damascus in a Silver Ghost Rolls Royce. This is not made up. It is what actually occurred and is evidenced by a surviving photo which we have included as part of this blog post. Sitting beside T. E. Lawrence will be his fellow British officer, Lieutenant Edward Ware, the hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series. The background will be of course Syrian. We have settled on an atmospheric photo of Bosra Sham including an arched gateway complete with oriental rugs.
The cover has not yet been drawn so we cannot yet show it to you. But we here at Cheops Books LLC will keep you posted on its progress.

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The Armistice Plot To Be Published Next Year:

The Battle of Damascus at the end of the First World War was the final and conclusive battle in the Mesopotamian Theater of the war as illustrated in The Armistice Plot. It was not a theater of the war in which Americans were participating. It was a British show under General Allenby and Lawrence of Arabia. But after Lawrence drove into town, the Turks were ready to surrender and sign the Armistice.

As part of next year’s commemoration of the end of World War 1, Cheops Books LLC is publishing not only Paris Peace Plot to commemorate the Paris Peace Conference at the end of the war, it will be publishing The Armistice Plot also about Lawrence of Arabia’s greatest triumph, its lead up, and its aftermath.

Edward Ware starts the novel meeting his greatest adversary, the future Helga von Wessel, as a tomb robber stealing artifacts from his excavation at Carchemish. The situation in the Middle East heats up. The Arabs revolt. The British fight the Turks. But Helga always manages to get in his way trying to steal the maps drawn by Edward’s commanding officer, Lawrence of Arabia.

It doesn’t even matter that Helga gets thrown into jail at the end of the Battle of Damascus. She is back again after the war spying for the future Adolf Hitler. Many of her fellow confederates from the war in the Middle East have gone Nazi.

The cover for The Armistice Plot will be ready soon.

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The Battle of Aqaba took place 100 years ago yesterday on July 6, 1917. It was not that big a battle but it was symbolically important.  I don’t go into it much in my novel Key to Lawrence: Special Edition, though it does play a part. My big set piece is something called the Battle of Petra which apparently is where Lawrence was holed up in that area of the desert. It was nearby on the high ground. But I cannot determine if the battle ever really took place. It is reported in the narrative of Lowell Thomas, the American reporter, called With Lawrence in Arabia. But I’ve never found it anywhere else. So it is probably apocryphal. But it sounded so good I couldn’t ignore it. All that stuff about how German troops invaded the Siq in Petra and had boiling oil poured down on their heads by Arab women that Lawrence of Arabia recruited. Before the Battle of Petra German airplanes strafed Edward. It was just too dramatic to resist.

What I go into more is the Battle of Damascus whose 100th anniversary is coming up next year on October 1, 2018. This was the battle that concluded the whole Arabian Campaign or Mesopotamian Theater, or whatever. The Turks sued for peace after that. That I cover in a novel called Map Plot, which is from Lieutenant Edward Ware’s point of view. Next year I hope to have an Armistice edition of that book which has never been published before.

Map Plot coming soon on Amazon.com

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One hundred years ago, on July 6, 1917, an Arab army led by Auda abu Tayi and Captain T.E. Lawrence (“Lawrence of Arabia”) captured the key Turkish outpost of Aqaba (today, Aqaba, Jordan). Nearly two months before, on May 9, 1917, abu Tayi and Lawrence, along with 45 Arabs, left the headquarters of the Arab Revolt in Wehj on the Arabian peninsula. Lawrence had come up with a plan to attack Aqaba from the landward side, rather than the heavily fortified sea side. He did not share these plans with any other British officer before leaving Wehj.

Each man carried water and a 45-pound sack of flour. Lawrence, who was wearing Arab robes and riding a camel, also carried 22,000 British gold sovereigns. He and Auda Abu Tayi used the gold to attract fighters from tribes along the way. After eight weeks in the desert, the band had grown to 500 fighters, riding dozens of horses and hundreds of camels.

On July 2, 1917, the Arab army attacked and annihilated a Turkish relief column of several hundred men at an outpost 40 miles to the north of Aqaba, Aba el Lissan. The Arabs then rode into Aqaba, whose 300-man garrison quickly surrendered without firing a shot. They “splashed into the sea” on July 6, 1917.

Lawrence then immediately followed up on the victory by traveling an additional 150 miles by camel across the Sinai desert to bring news of Aqaba’s fall to the British in Egypt. Meeting with the new British military commander, General Allenby, Lawrence persuaded him to provide weapons, supplies and pay for the Arab forces.

The fall of Aqaba is related in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel Key to Lawrence: Special Edition.

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Trump and Lawrence of Arabia:
Gary claims that the grateful Syrians have given Trump a new nickname in northern Syria. It is Abu Ivanka al-Amriki. It means “Father of Ivanka, the American”. This is reminiscent of those days during the Arab Revolt during the Great War, or World War 1, one hundred years ago. Naturally it reminds me of the Arabs calling T. E. Lawrence “El Orens” among other titles. T. E. Lawrence under General Allenby helped to liberate the Arabs of the day from the Ottoman Turks. Lawrence and Allenby defeated the Turks in the Battle of Damascus in the autumn of 1918, one hundred years late next year. Are the Arabs expecting Trump to liberate them from the tyrant, Assad, and the Russians. If Trump can do this by jawboning the Russians, trying to separate them from the Iranians and their client Dictator Assad, and he can fire a few Tomahawk missiles now and then to show he means business, so much the better. Maybe they won’t even have to have a Battle of Damascus, which was quite dramatic. The Turks deserted, and Lawrence rode into town in an old car the next day. I bet Trump won’t have to even ride into Damascus. By the way Lawrence visited Damascus, too, and had various other adventures with the resident Turks in town. Trump can hopefully do it all by using diplomatic means as well as his new Secretary of State, Tillerson. If Trump does succeed in ousting Assad and defeating IS in the Middle East maybe the Arabs will call him by an even more memorable title. Maybe someday he will have a movie made about him like Lawrence of Arabia.

Lawrence of Arabia, Sidi Lawrence, El Orens, is a major character in Key to Lawrence Special Edition published by Cheops Books LLC.

 

T.E. Lawrence

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Remember the Lusitania America Enters WW1:

One hundred years ago on April 6, 1917 America declared war on Germany and entered the Great War, the First World War, or World War 1. Dora has been reading missives from her fiance, Lieutenant Edward Ware who is off at the front fighting in the Middle East with Lawrence of Arabia. She interrupts her reading to answer the phone to hear the news from her best friend, Rita Jolivet, the French actress, who was a fellow survivor of the Lusitania two years before. The Lusitania was one of the many causes of America’s entry into the European conflict “over there”. The scene is slightly edited to make sense out of context. You can read the rest in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel, Key to Lawrence Special Edition:

 

“Hello?” Dora answered automatically, jolting awake from her trance.

“It’s me!” exclaimed Rita. “I’m in New York City. Listen to this.”

Rita must have been holding her phone up to an open window. A paper boy cried as if in a far off world removed from her present devastation: “Read all about it! Read all about it! President Wilson calls for Declaration of War against Germany.”

Her father burst through the door grumbling and shoved a newspaper into her free hand. She gaped at the bold headline:

PRESIDENT CALLS FOR WAR DECLARATION, STRONGER NAVY, NEW ARMY OF 500,000 MEN, FULL CO-OPERATION WITH GERMANY’S FOES

Below that was the text of the President’s address from the previous day when he spoke before the Joint Houses. At the bottom of the page it read: The War Resolution Now Before Congress.

“We’re in. Wilson’s done it, damn the fellow.” Mr. Benley threw up his hands.
Dora just gaped at him.

Her father nodded grimly. “I’ll have Wilson impeached. I’m going to start getting signatures today. I’ll send them to my congressman and senators. We want to keep America pure from European wars!”

Dora thought, So Ali and the Kaiser have forced us into this war!

Her father exclaimed, “It’s enough to make you want to move to the Alaska Territory!”

On the phone Rita deduced, “I guess the American President and Congress finally remembered the Lusitania.”

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Apes of Gibraltar Play Part In Edward Ware Thrillers

The infamous apes of Gibraltar that live on the rocks outside town and have done so for hundreds of years play an unexpected role in the Edward War Thrillers at War Series. Dora and Edward are at their wits’ end trying to escape Hitler and his spies, Herr and Helga von Wessel. They have been trapped in Germany, have just recently rescued their little girl from the clutches of the Dictator, and are trying to escape from the Continent all together. They charter a yacht and end up in Gibraltar where Dora gets a bright idea about the apes and what they can do for Churchill and the cause of fighting Hitler.
This is part of the world wide chase over the Lawrence maps, key to world domination. Hitler wants them. Edward and Churchill have them. And the contest goes on. What can the apes of Gibraltar, Barbary Apes, or Barbary macaques, have to do with the Lawrence maps? Read the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series and find out soon.

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Colonel Sir Edward Ware has hidden the Lawrence maps, key to world domination, just about everywhere in the world —- except a petrified log. He has hidden the maps in the Rosetta Stone in the British Museum. He has hidden it in his tent in the Syrian Desert during the Great War and the Arab Revolt when he was fighting under Lawrence of Arabia to free the Arabs from the Ottoman Turks. Dora, his fiance and then his wife, hid the maps in her bedroom closet at her house in Pittsburgh also during the Arab Revolt. Later Edward and Dora hid them under the floorboards at Ware Hall, Edward’s estate in the south of England. Numerous times Edward was forced to hide the maps up his uniform sleeve. He had a special compartment sewed in his clothes to house them while spying on Hitler for Winston Churchill.
But while fleeing spies who have been trailing him since New York, while heading down the Lincoln Highway to meet Churchill’s agent to hand over the maps, his back is up against the wall literally. This time it is a petrified wall made of petrified rock. He veers off course before he gets to Yellowstone and heads south all the way to the desert to hide. Where shall he hide the maps?
The Painted Desert spread out before him, an infinite badlands, punctuated by petrified logs. It is tempting to pick one of them for the maps. The maps would be almost impossible to find. No one would have a clue in such a vast wasteland which petrified log to explore. But he had better not lose the key to where he hid them or he might never find them again himself.

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The hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series, Edward Ware, meets T.E. Lawrence, the Oxfordian and assistant to Leonard Woolley, at the excavation at Carchemish in Turkey during the summer of 1914. Even then Lawrence is busy at work drawing military maps for the government of Great Britain. The Kaiser is sending spies into the camp at Carchemish to steal the maps.
From that point on Edward and Lawrence are a pair. It is the chief relationship of the series that dictates the plot. Edward devotes his life to defending the maps though it costs him personal tragedy and hardship for decades. He puts the welfare of Great Britain first.
Edward serves as adjutant to T. E. Lawrence during the Great War during the Arab Revolt. He is present at most of Lawrence of Arabia’s famous victories including the final one at Damascus that causes the Ottomans to surrender and seek peace at the end of the Great War.
After the Paris Peace Conference in which T. E. Lawrence plays a role, Edward goes to Cairo to help Churchill and T. E. Lawrence divide up the Middle East. From there on Edward and Churchill devote themselves to finding a proper hiding place for the maps.
The Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series would not be the same without T. E. Lawrence, or Lawrence of Arabia.

T.E. Lawrence

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Edward’s parents, Sir Adolphus Ware and Annabelle Ware, run a British automobile company, Adolphus Motors, from his estate in the south of England, Ware Hall. Edward’s father is so successful that he is knighted and made a sir, a title which Edward can inherit. His hobby is archaeology. He helps to fund an expedition in Carchemish in Turkey in 1913-1914 under the supervision of archaeologist Leonard Woolley. He meets T. E. Lawrence, who has begun a project of drawing military maps as the Great War begins. The little camp in the desert is attacked by German spies sent by the Kaiser. T. E. Lawrence, Leonard Woolley, Sir Adolphus Ware, and Edward must flee back to England. Thus begins the battle of the Lawrence maps, which the Germans will ultimately consider the key to world domination.

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