Candide As A Book For Our Own Time:

Actually the Black Death would have been a good example why people from the late Middle Ages would NEVER visit London and perhaps for a while after that. Sanitation conditions were such that it was better NOT to visit at all. Ditto with the Great Plague, although I am not sure what it was. The same with the Great Fire. Cities were not set up for fire prevention in the old days. It was better NOT to be there. Obviously it would have been crazy to visit London during the Blitz. These are all conditions that mankind has to learn to prevent over time. You are giving ammunition to my argument. If you compare Salisbury with the Black Death, the town ought to be evacuated until such time as mankind comes to understand chemical weapons better and can control them and the conditions they cause. And right now, Gary reports, donations to Salisbury Cathedral are down 40%.

“Fear and hysteria” have nothing to do with it. It is more like being smart. It is called commonsense. You stay away from something that is obviously dangerous. You didn’t comment on what I said about the shore excursions. But Cunard is showing no common sense in having tourists visit places like Guatemala and El Salvador. The US State Department even agrees with me. They could actually be sued.

Taken to its philosophic height this sort of logic culminates in Voltaire’s character, Candide. The young man wanders around Europe witnessing this disaster and that including the Lisbon Earthquake. At the end he concludes that the sane man does not venture outside his own well-cultivated garden. It is not safe. Have you ever heard of Candide? Would you say that there were so many fears and anxieties In Candide‘s life and in Voltaire’s that you could not imagine how they coped?

I have found an intriguing version of Candide on Amazon called the Norton Critical Edition. I will be getting it myself to reacquaint myself with the work which I have not read in its entirety since I was in high school. You should read it too. Candide is after all the great optimist who was taught by his tutor named Pangloss that this is the “best of all possible worlds”. But adventure after adventure sadly proves otherwise. In the end Candide must remind Pangloss that the sum of wisdom is to stay in your own garden and cultivate that.

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New Road Secret From Cheops Books LLC

As Cheops Books LLC plans to be on the road again researching ideas for its fiction, it wants to share with you one of its newest, best travel tips: Airbnb. We have been looking to cut dollars off the high cost of travel that has more than doubled in recent years. It used to be that you had to plan to be in a different motel along the interstates every night. Now thanks to Airbnb you can book private residences as you go instead at a fraction of the cost.

Want a yard for your dog? A fenced in yard at that? Want a shower instead of a bath tub? Want a kitchen for a change to make your own meals and cut food expenses, too? Again look no farther than Airbnb.

This road secret applies to international travel as well as local and state to state travel. You are likely to find places to rent in London, Paris, and Rome as well as Cheyenne, Wyoming, but you will probably get a bigger selection in the more populous capitals. Airbnb seems to be everywhere to serve you.

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Another Edward Ware Thrillers Plot:

How about this one? If you were pursuing it nowadays you would start in London and take the Eurostar through the Chunnel to Paris. Back in Edward’s and Dora’s time you would have to take a ferry. Then you would catch the train in the central station in Paris to be taken to Milan by the end of the day. You would get to view the French Alps and then the Italian Alps out the window as evening came on. Once you arrived in Milan you would hurry across the street to the Holiday Inn. Then the next day you would rent a car. From there you would drive to Florence and then Rome. You might even take in Ravenna along the way on the opposite coast just to be different. Then some days later you would go back in exactly the same way. You would catch the train in Milan to go to Paris and then London.

From London you would return to Southampton and cross the Atlantic on the Queen Mary. From the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal you would take a car back to Tucson, Arizona. How about that for an itinerary! What plot would follow this sort of pattern? You could only imagine. Very suspenseful.

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Helga In The Tower of London:

“Edward,” Churchill exclaimed, “you did not let me know about Helga von Wessel!” He threw out his arms to take in the whole dining room at the Savoy. “She surprised me by barging in here. I didn’t invite her. She invited herself.”

Edward tried to get hold of himself. He had not been expecting this at all. Even his wife hung back in the shadows unseen by Helga, bracing herself for she did not know what would come next. But he had to think fast.

“I did not have a chance to tell you, sir,” Edward forced himself to step into the room though his wife continued to hang back in the shadows beyond the doorway. “I was imprisoned in an Ice Palace in Denali National Park. I could not communicate with anyone until I managed to escape. You got one report from me then. But basically I was trying to get back here as fast as possible to talk to you first.”

Helga threw back her head and laughed. “You know you cannot escape me, Edward. You should know that by now. Just because you slipped out of Igor’s reach and evaded Dr. Frankenstein’s grasp, you cannot think that you evaded me! That would be too simpleton-like.”

Out of the corner of his eye Edward watched Lady Ware slip back into the shadows. He hoped she could read his mind. He could only keep his fingers crossed.

He took a seat beside Churchill so he could keep an eye on the door to the room without making Helga suspect anything.

“You must give me your latest map, the one you are hoarding,” Helga leaned across the table. “Khrushchev wants to know what you are up to. And I would not suggest you thwart me or even attempt to do so. I showed you what I almost did with your wife and could easily do again,” Helga looked at Edward with a barely concealed threat in her eye.
Edward exchanged looks with Churchill.

Churchill was a past master at this sort of thing. He took out a map from his desk that Edward knew to be a fake. He kept it there for that express purpose. He thrust it in front of her with great drama.

Helga began to pour over it. She was so absorbed that she did not hear the door opening from behind with barely a sound. Edward did not move an inch. Neither did Churchill as Dora, Lady Ware, approached Helga from behind with her pistol at the ready. She stuck her in the back and said, “The game is up.”

Helga gave a little shriek. Edward did not give her a chance to recover before he grabbed her. Churchill pushed a button and spoke into the microphone installed for him at his table at the Savoy, the one reserved just for the Prime Minister. “Send me the sergeant at arms back at Whitehall. I keep him around to make sudden arrests.”

Helga was marched off to a holding cell in the Tower of London.

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I don’t like poetry either for the most part. That is no doubt why I never wrote it. That is probably why I write novels. It is probably why you write novels, too. I just thought of something neat. You will think it is neat, too. The passage I sent you yesterday has a new meaning based on terrorist attack on London Bridge this year in England. Think of a newspaper reporter talking about the attack on tourists on London Bridge and quoting these lines from T.S. Eliot: “A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many, I had not thought death had undone so many . . . ” T.S. Eliot must have had a premonition about the future.

By the way this same T.S. Eliot also wrote poetry for children a little bit later on. He showed that he had the ability to entertain people by writing Possum’s Book of Practical Cats about pussycats. For instance there is Macavity the Mystery Cat who is called the “hidden paw” and who has the ability to be the “Master criminal who can defy the law”. Apparently this book of verse for children was also the inspiration for Cats: A Musical. It must have been T.S. Eliot’s more pop or American side. After all he was an American who was born in America and moved to Britain to become a British citizen.

Cheops Books LLC publishes only novels, not poetry. This autumn it will publish Dark 3: Special Edition on September 15, Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel Hitler’s Agent on October 15, Dark 1 on November 1, Dark 2 on November 8, Dark: A Trilogy on November 15, and Captive at the Berghof part 1 in the German language on December 15. The publication of Old Faithful Plot, an Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel, will soon be announced. None of the novels contain any poetry.

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In Map Plot, soon to be published by Cheops Books LLC, the hero of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series, Lieutenant Sir Edward Ware, must undertake a spy mission to Venice for Winston Churchill. In the early 1920s Adolf Hitler is coming to power in the new National Socialist Workers Party. His financial backer is trading magnate Herr von Wessel. Edward must find a trail of letters between the two at Herr von Wessel’s palazzo in Venice. When he gets the goods he has to escape fast, but in his day and age one hundred years ago there is nothing faster than the Orient Express that slowly wends its way from Venice to Paris. The time it takes allows ample space for intrigue. Herr von Wessel and his new wife, Helga, go after Edward on the train. The big confrontation occurs in the dining car. And he still had to take a ferry to Britain and then another train to London to reach Churchill! But if Edward had the advantages of the modern Eurostar Train that goes from Brussels to London practically at the speed of an airplane, Edward could have gotten there in a flash and no one would have been the wiser.

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