Jason and Medea: A Novel for Young Adults:

Here we have Dora Benley’s latest novel about the ancient world. This time she turns to mythology for her inspiration and picks a well known tale. But she has her own original rendition of he fabled story.

Without Medea’s help, Jason had no mere mortal hope of getting the Golden Fleece and bringing it home to his people. Medea would have to betray her family and her people to save Jason, this golden giant among men, whom she came to love. Together they would face the wrath of a people and take on the gods in Jason and Medea: A Novel for middle grades to young adult readers brought to you by Edward Ware Thrillers YA, an imprint of Cheops Books, LLC. Stories out of the past.

If you enjoyed this young adult mythological romantic suspense tale — which breaks ground in not following the most conventional story about Medea but tells its own thrilling romance — you might want to read Dora Benley’s other Greek and Roman novels for YA’s including Julius Caesar: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Cleopatra’s Stone, Medea the Witch, Julia: A Novel, Minotaur, and Book of the Dead.

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Medea the Witch Special Promotion Starts Wednesday:

Cheops Books LLC is featuring Medea the Witch on its Special Promotions Page this week. You will be able to download it for free starting Wednesday on Amazon Kindle. It is a mythological tale about ancient Greece that features the Thera volcano. It formed a huge caldera that you can still visit today on the island of Santorini in a region that is still seismically unstable.

Medea the Witch is the story of Jason and Medea told from the point of view of Medea. This is not the more familiar tale of Jason’s voyage to Colchis in which the latter encounters Harpies and monsters at every turn (i.e., the material of the 1950’s movie Jason and the Argonauts), but rather it is the tale of the clash of two very different cultures. Medea comes from the fading world of Goddess worshipers with a long matriarchal tradition. She is suddenly thrust into Jason’s Greek world of the followers of the Sky God Zeus where women are best left behind veils. No one understands her “magic” and she is called a “witch.” She is left to defend herself as best she can. The death of her tradition combines with the havoc wreaked by the Thera volcanic eruption at the end of the Bronze Age to presage the end of her world.

If you liked Medea the Witch, you will like other tales by Dora Benley including Minotaur, Helen of Troy, Book of the Dead, Mary’s Gone, and Latin Lessons.

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Medea the Witch by Dora Benley will be offered free on Amazon Kindle starting Wednesday and continuing for the next five days. But hurry! An offer like this won’t be repeated this year.

Medea the Witch is the story of Jason and Medea told from the point of view of Medea. This is not the more familiar tale of Jason’s voyage to Colchis in which the latter encounters Harpies and monsters at every turn (i.e., the material of the 1950’s movie Jason and the Argonauts), but rather it is the tale of the clash of two very different cultures. Medea comes from the fading world of Goddess worshipers with a long matriarchal tradition. She is suddenly thrust into Jason’s Greek world of the followers of the Sky God Zeus where women are best left behind veils. No one understands her “magic” and she is called a “witch.” She is left to defend herself as best she can. The death of her tradition combines with the havoc wreaked by the Thera volcanic eruption at the end of the Bronze Age to presage the end of her world.
If you liked Medea the Witch, you will like other tales by Dora Benley including Minotaur, Helen of Troy, Book of the Dead, Mary’s Gone, and Latin Lessons.

 

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Minotaur by Dora Benley
Minotaur will be offered in a special free promotion starting Wednesday, May 30 and going for the next five days. But hurry! A promotion like this won’t happen again this year.
A knock in the middle of the night decides Oneone’s fate. Her father has just been murdered mysteriously. The Court at Knossos summons her to serve. She must give up her fiance, the Prince of Zakros, and follow the messengers. She cannot be sure who has called her or for what reason. As she is kept waiting outside an anteroom in the Palace, she studies a bull rhyton lying on the floor and gazes into its wondrous eyes. It has no answers. The Mother Goddess has reserved a special fate for this young woman. She will not guess at its magnitude and importance until a smoking volcano lays waste the kingdom and the waters of the sea rise up to engulf it in this historical mythological novel about ancient Greece at the time of the Minoans by Dora Benley. A reader says, “A whole other world and an interesting take on the Minotaur legend. I expected something different but was pleased nonetheless. Transports you to a time of hardships and triumphs with many tears shed in between.”
If you enjoyed this historical thriller by Dora Benley you will also like her other recently published books. She is the author of Mary’s Gone, Latin Lessons, Book of the Dead, and Helen of Troy. To be published later this year are Dark 3: Special Edition and Hitler’s Agent.

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Children of the Hydra’s Teeth are the ultimate special effect of the movie, Jason and the Argonauts, which appear in the climactic scene right before Jason and Medea escape from Colchis carrying the Golden Fleece. They look like something out of an Edgar Allen Poe tale. King Aeetes throws the teeth down on the ground of Colchis. Up spring warriors rising from their graves to avenge the people of Colchis. The Children of the Hydra’s Teeth are carrying swords, the battalion of the dead who cannot be killed because they are already dead.
Ultimately it shows off fears of the wild geography of the Colchis region. It is full of mountains and cliffs along the sea. From any cave, from any crevice can come an enemy or an unexpected creature. That is why something like the Children of the Hydra’s Teeth seem appropriate for the region.
There are no Children of the Hydra’s Teeth at the end of Medea’s Escape. But the sea, the cliffs, and the mountains through which the heroine must escape are equally compelling.

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Ray Harryhausen Special Effects: Jason finally reaches the climactic scene of the movie Jason and the Argonauts in a scene the resonates with the Cheops Books young adult thriller Medea’s Escape. Medea must make her choice to give away the Golden Fleece and follow Jason in the movie. Then Jason must fight the hydra-headed beast that looks like a dinosaur any day. He is almost captured but he frees himself. He is warned that King Aeetes is after him. He and Medea flee toward the Argo with the Argonauts.
In the novel Medea’s Escape, the heroine’s choice is a bit different. But we won’t spoil the plot or the ending in an original rendition of the myth. However the movie once again sets the place and time where the Greeks had wandered into a far off world with a different religion and different customs and did not know what to expect next. Harryhausen Special Effects make you really get into this mind frame.

You can purchase Medea’s Escape on Amazon Kindle for only $5.99.

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Medea Performs at the Temple of Hecate: The scene where Medea performs in the Temple of Hecate comes closest to the Cheops Books LLC mythological novel, Medea’s Escape. Medea in the movie Jason and the Argonauts announces to Jason that she is a priestess in the Temple of Hecate, the Goddess of the Colchians. Jason rescues her from a shipwreck and takes her back to Colchis. That is followed by a ceremonial dance with Medea and her maidens inside the temple. We have purple costumes and giant statues of gods and goddesses. The scene at the Temple of Hecate ends with a banquet where Jason meets King Aeetes, the father of Medea, who immediately turns against him.
This scene introduces the Mother Goddess religion, which is the theme of the Cheops Books novel Medea’s Escape. It is the reason why Medea is often called a witch. But it is also the original prehistoric religion which was practiced everywhere in the world. It is the theme not only of Medea’s Escape but also of To Follow the Goddess, the first novel that Cheops Books ever published. It recounts the Trojan War from the point of view of Helen. That novel is also for sale on Kindle.
Today is the last day of the Kindle Countdown Deal for the young adult mythological thriller, Medea’s Escape.

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Medea’s Escape Countdown Deal: In the next special effects scene in the 1963 movie Jason and the Argonauts we have another illustration of what the ancient Greeks knew about the geography of their world. The Argonauts navigate the Hellespont on the way to the Black Sea, filmed in 1963 along the rocky southern coast of Italy. It is a narrow channel for sure. Rocks start cascading down the hillside into the water. The ship ahead of them sinks. But they decide to proceed anyway. A giant Poseidon appears and holds back the cascading rocks on the hillside so the Argo can slip through what the Greeks perceive to be a mysterious, unknown, dangerous region, too far away from where they live to venture.
The Cheops Books novel Medea’s Escape has more to do with the ancient Mother Goddess religion instead of all these male gods such as Poseidon, but still this movie gives you a good idea of the Bronze Age time period about 1500BC to 1250BC in which the Jason story took place long before the age of Pericles in classical Athens and even longer before the Hellenistic Period or the Romans themselves. The Bronze Age seems mysterious no matter when or how you study it or read about it.
The $.99 Amazon Countdown Deal for Medea’s Escape ends tomorrow so hurry and download a copy before it’s gone.

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Phineas the Blind Man and the Harpies: I emphasized the mastery with which Jason and the Argonauts, the 1963 family mythological film for all ages, pursues special effects. In fact, the whole movie is little more than a connected series of these special effects episodes. They don’t interfere with the plot of the pursuit of the Golden Fleece in any way nor do they interfere with the character presentation. On the contrary, they serve as examples to help illustrate Jason’s growing heroism and self-reliance.
In this episode Jason must defeat the Harpies who plague the seer Phineas the Blind Man to find out how to get to Colchis. The Argonauts trap the Harpies in a net and build a cage. Then they hold a feast with Phineas. He tells them to go through the clashing rocks in five days, then proceed northeast to Colchis. But now Jason and his Argonauts have no god to protect them. Hera can no longer help. He has already asked her the five allowed questions. Now he is on his own just like any hero, which of course builds up to the next special effects scene.
This movie serves as an excellent backdrop for the Cheops Books LLC novel Medea’s Escape. The plot isn’t the same, but the age level is, both rather YA or for all age levels. Both were also inspired by Apollonius of Rhodes who wrote the Argonautica instead of Euripides, which is the more popular version of the myth.

 

Phineas

 

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More 1963 Special Effects: Talos is the name written on the statue found on the beach of the island where the Argonauts land. Hercules steals weapon from treasure trove and awakens the monster, Talos, who chases the crew back to the Argo. The Argonauts try to escape through two rocks that define a bay. But the monster reaches down and grabs the boat. They must all swim ashore. The giant Bronze Man follows them until Jason appeals to the figurehead who tells him to look to Talos’s ankles. In a scene that echoes Achilles’ heel, Jason attacks and defeats the monster so they can rebuild the Argo and get on their way to find the Golden Fleece at the end of the world in Colchis.
This special effects scene from the movie Jason and the Argonauts tells you what the Greeks thought of geography in their day. As soon as you sailed away from the islands in the Aegean you were in uncivilized, foreign, alien, barbarian territory where anything at all could happen. It was a place where evil lurked around every rock and boulder, and people in Greece would believe there were giant bronze men who could rise up against sailors and sink their boats. It was sort of like the people in the Middle Ages who though the Earth was flat and you would sail off it and fall into the abyss if you sailed far enough away from home. In ancient Greece only heroes and adventurers like Jason would even attempt such a feat. That is why it is the subject of 1963 Special Effects.

Watching this movie would be a good activity before reading the Cheops Books LLC  young adult mythological thriller novel called Medea’s Escape being offered this week on a Kindle Countdown Deal for only $.99 cents, a deal not to be repeated.

Talos, the Bronze Man

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