Helen of Troy #5 In Ancient Civilizations on Amazon Kindle:

Helen of Troy is on a five day promotion on Amazon Kindle. It is #5 in Ancient Civilizations. Get it while it is still free.

First-novelist Dora Benley recounts the fall of Troy from Helen’s point of view—in this spirited page-turner that placed in the National Writers Book Contest.

Though brought up to inherit the role of her mother, Queen Leda, as keeper of the ancient mother-goddess cult increasingly suppressed by the reigning kings, beautiful Helen of Sparta initially fails to hear the Goddess of Heaven’s voice within her. And no wonder—the hormone-bedeviled teenager lusts after handsome Meneleus, whose family has offended the Goddess by looting her temples for bronze. Upon Leda’s death, the Goddess offers Helen the choice of marrying Meneleus at the cost of a life of misery and the destruction of Sparta, or sacrificing him in favor of older, craggy-faced Odysseus—the “wisest among the Achaeans”—with whom Helen would enjoy a long, happy reign as Sparta’s queen. Naturally, Helen chooses Meneleus, and thus follows betrayals, misunderstandings, and intrigues that lead to the destruction of Sparta and Troy. Kidnapped by Paris, forced to marry him and bear sons by his cleverer brother, Deiphobus, Helen concentrates on protecting the hordes who worship her—whether as the Goddess on Earth in Sparta or as Inanna in Troy.

Her efforts to play out the Goddess’s maternal role are at cross purposes with the male rulers’ ambitions, however—and constant misunderstandings result. Herding her subjects out of besieged Sparta, she is accused of abandoning her post. Refusing to abandon her Trojan sons when Meneleus arrives to rescue her, she commits treason. Then, attempting to free the Trojan people from their despotic rulers by allowing the Trojan horse within the city walls, she betrays her Trojan husband.
Kirkus Reviews says of the Helen of Troy novel: “Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.”

If you liked Helen of Troy you will enjoy other novels by Dora Benley including the Julius Caesar: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Medea the Witch, Minotaur, and Cleopatra’s Stone.

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Five Day Promotion Begins For Helen of Troy:

Helen of Troy today begins a five-day promotion on Amazon Kindle. Get it while it is free. But hurry! An offer this good won’t be repeated this year.

First-novelist Dora Benley recounts the fall of Troy from Helen’s point of view—in this spirited page-turner that placed in the National Writers Book Contest.

Though brought up to inherit the role of her mother, Queen Leda, as keeper of the ancient mother-goddess cult increasingly suppressed by the reigning kings, beautiful Helen of Sparta initially fails to hear the Goddess of Heaven’s voice within her. And no wonder—the hormone-bedeviled teenager lusts after handsome Meneleus, whose family has offended the Goddess by looting her temples for bronze. Upon Leda’s death, the Goddess offers Helen the choice of marrying Meneleus at the cost of a life of misery and the destruction of Sparta, or sacrificing him in favor of older, craggy-faced Odysseus—the “wisest among the Achaeans”—with whom Helen would enjoy a long, happy reign as Sparta’s queen. Naturally, Helen chooses Meneleus, and thus follows betrayals, misunderstandings, and intrigues that lead to the destruction of Sparta and Troy. Kidnapped by Paris, forced to marry him and bear sons by his cleverer brother, Deiphobus, Helen concentrates on protecting the hordes who worship her—whether as the Goddess on Earth in Sparta or as Inanna in Troy.

Her efforts to play out the Goddess’s maternal role are at cross purposes with the male rulers’ ambitions, however—and constant misunderstandings result. Herding her subjects out of besieged Sparta, she is accused of abandoning her post. Refusing to abandon her Trojan sons when Meneleus arrives to rescue her, she commits treason. Then, attempting to free the Trojan people from their despotic rulers by allowing the Trojan horse within the city walls, she betrays her Trojan husband.
Kirkus Reviews says of the Helen of Troy novel: “Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.”

If you liked Helen of Troy you will enjoy other novels by Dora Benley including the Julius Caesar: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Medea the Witch, Minotaur, and Cleopatra’s Stone.

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Opening Passages Of Hitler’s Chief Spy:

Here are the opening passages of the upcoming historical thriller novel Hitler’s Chief Spy by Dora Benley to be published by Cheops Books LLC on Friday, May 18. If you want a chance to win a free copy, you can still enter the Goodreads Giveaway to win one of one hundred free copies on the day of publication.

Chapter 1: Hamburg Harbor July, 1935

Edward looked from one end of Hamburg Harbor to the other, searching for his wife.
“Have you seen Lady Ware?” he asked Brigadier “Wickie” Roberts.

His superior was about to board the Deutschland. The ship featured the new Hitler turret, which they had just gotten a chance to review in the parade of ships up the Elbe River. He and Brigadier Roberts were part of the British military mission sent to Germany by Prime Minister Baldwin to celebrate the recent signing of the Anglo-German Naval Treaty.
 The brigadier shrugged. “Not recently.”

“When was the last time you saw Dora?” Edward pressed.

“Right before the parade of ships. She was in a heated discussion with Frau von Wessel, you know, the wife of the Commercial Attaché at the German Embassy in London.”

The German Chancellor, Adolf Hitler, had been doing his best to distract Edward with probing questions. Frau von Wessel, Hitler’s chief spy, was likely after his wife about the same thing that Hitler was after him for — the Lawrence maps.

“Edward!”

A five foot five lady with her tightly curled chestnut brown hair pinned in a bun back against her neck rushed toward him. His wife of ten months looked rattled. Yet she managed to maintain her dignity and keep her sharply peaked black Elsa Schiaparelli hat from Paris straight on her head.

As he took her arm he hissed, “Where is Thomasina?”

“Lucy was carrying our baby. Now they are both gone because of that Von Wessel bitch!” Dora gritted her teeth.

“What happened?” he pressed.

“I was having tea with the other ladies. I turned around to ask Lucy if she wanted a cup. She and Thomasina had disappeared.”
 “Hitler used the parade of ships as a distraction to kidnap our daughter.” Edward whispered to his wife as they advanced toward the boarding ramp surrounded by members of the German Embassy in London and various other military personnel representing Great Britain. “I would not put anything past that bastard after he killed Lawrence practically right in front of my eyes in May.”

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New Road Secret From Cheops Books LLC

As Cheops Books LLC plans to be on the road again researching ideas for its fiction, it wants to share with you one of its newest, best travel tips: Airbnb. We have been looking to cut dollars off the high cost of travel that has more than doubled in recent years. It used to be that you had to plan to be in a different motel along the interstates every night. Now thanks to Airbnb you can book private residences as you go instead at a fraction of the cost.

Want a yard for your dog? A fenced in yard at that? Want a shower instead of a bath tub? Want a kitchen for a change to make your own meals and cut food expenses, too? Again look no farther than Airbnb.

This road secret applies to international travel as well as local and state to state travel. You are likely to find places to rent in London, Paris, and Rome as well as Cheyenne, Wyoming, but you will probably get a bigger selection in the more populous capitals. Airbnb seems to be everywhere to serve you.

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Latest Crazy Plot for Edward Ware Thrillers:

Try this plot on for size. Midsummer Dora and Edward leave the Desert Southwest, Cheops Books LLC Headquarters, and drive north through Wyoming to keep it cool. They might even stop at Yellowstone to let the coolness permeate everything before heading due east through Pittsburgh to visit Dora’s parents and onward to New York to board the ship. The ship takes them predictably to Southampton where they rent a car at the Southampton Airport for the next twenty-two days. The spies are onto them.

They visit all the tourist sites in the south of England from Bath to Dover. They make themselves look like tourists when they are secretly meeting with operatives. They make sure to have tea with Winston Churchill at his estate at Chartwell in Kent. Then they deceive everybody and make themselves hard to follow when at the very end of August they board a ship in Southampton that takes them to Gibraltar. They seem to be playing with the apes. Really at night they are signalling spies on the African Coast not far away in Morocco.

They hope nobody notices as they stop briefly at Cartegena in Spain and Valencia in Spain to meet with operatives while other tourists tour around and see the sights. Finally they disembark in Rome as the plot thickens.

Great works of art have been the repository of the Lawrence maps before. This time they visit the Bargello Gallery and deposit them in a secret niche carved in Bernini’s statue, Apollo and Daphne.
Quickly they hurry out of Rome on a train to Milan. They take the train from Milan to Paris, meeting Winston at the Ritz just to confuse any possible spies or pursuers. They make their way back to Britain and then America.

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Another Edward Ware Thrillers Plot:

How about this one? If you were pursuing it nowadays you would start in London and take the Eurostar through the Chunnel to Paris. Back in Edward’s and Dora’s time you would have to take a ferry. Then you would catch the train in the central station in Paris to be taken to Milan by the end of the day. You would get to view the French Alps and then the Italian Alps out the window as evening came on. Once you arrived in Milan you would hurry across the street to the Holiday Inn. Then the next day you would rent a car. From there you would drive to Florence and then Rome. You might even take in Ravenna along the way on the opposite coast just to be different. Then some days later you would go back in exactly the same way. You would catch the train in Milan to go to Paris and then London.

From London you would return to Southampton and cross the Atlantic on the Queen Mary. From the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal you would take a car back to Tucson, Arizona. How about that for an itinerary! What plot would follow this sort of pattern? You could only imagine. Very suspenseful.

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Publication Dates For Novels In 2018:

Cheops Books LLC has come up with a rough outline of when various historical thrillers and historical romantic thrillers by Dora Benley will be released this year, 2018. First of all, on April 9 we expect to publish Julia: A Romance. Right now you can enter the Goodreads Giveaway for that romantic thriller about ancient Rome.

On May 4 we plan to publish the second volume in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series, Salisbury Plot, on Amazon Kindle. It has a brand new cover that will send chills up your spine. At the same time we will release the audiobook edition of the work on Audible.

On Saturday, June 16 we plan to release Old Faithful Plot in which Hitler plans to blow up Yellowstone National Park. The cover art by Daniel Teran is a real winner.

On October 1, the days that Lawrence of Arabia and General Allensby won the Battle of Damascus against the Ottoman Turks and brought about the Armistice to end the war will be the publication date of Armistice Plot which brings to an end everything about the First World War except Adolf Hitler.

Then on Armistice Day, November 11, the one hundredth anniversary of the end of World War 1, Cheops Books will publish Paris Peace Plot about the upcoming summit in Paris to sign the treaty to end the war. It was a treaty that was so poor, so malicious in intent, that the treaty itself became one of the major causes of World War 2. It was often cited by Adolf Hitler as such. And that leads right into other novels to come in the Edward Ware Thriller Series about World War 2.

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Is Socialism Better Than Private Enterprise?

You say that socialism means “sharing the burdens”. I am not sure what you mean by this, but if you mean offering more government programs and services at taxpayer expense, I guess that is where we should begin. BUT is the government really the best entity to offer these services? Do they offer the best quality services? I think NOT. Take the example of public education which is offered by the local and state government in America and by the national government in Paris, France for instance.

That is a good beginning point because it is a common service that we all share whether in America, Britain, or France. I have an MED in English Education which means master’s in English Education at the high school level. My mother was also a high school teacher. I did student teaching and even had a job teaching English for awhile. I came to the conclusion that no matter what they did, public education was always going to be second best. I went to a public grade school and high school. I didn’t learn very much there other than what I taught myself. But when I went to college, which was a private school, I learned much more. But public education remains because it is better than nothing, though it is a shocking burden at the local level because of local property taxes which support the schools.

The previous occupant of the White House was trying to expand the federal government’s reach into health care. All he succeeded in doing was to make it difficult to impossible for real people to buy health insurance plans. He made it so that you can’t even get a doctor to call you back on the phone since there is now a doctor shortage for no good reason except that he made it hard for doctors to have private practices anymore. Health care became second rate. Hopefully Trump’s tax bill which also included a provision to kill the mandate has started to change things.

Not that the government can’t do anything in regard to services. It would be hard to see how public highways could be private. it would be hard to see how the military could be private. However as a footnote, when armies WERE private back during the days of the late Roman Republic you had legendary and famous armies as well as the most famous general in history, Julius Caesar.

Cheops Books LLC publishes various Roman novels such as Livia: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Caesar’s Lost Legions, Pliny: A Novel, and Julia: A Romance.

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Helen of Troy On Special Christmas Promotion NOW:

Starting today and continuing through the weekend you will find Helen of Troy on special promotion on Amazon. You can download the Kindle edition of the historical thriller for free. Don’t miss it! But hurry! An offer this good won’t be repeated this year.

First-novelist Dora Benley recounts the fall of Troy from Helen’s point of view—in this spirited page-turner that placed in the National Writers Book Contest.

Though brought up to inherit the role of her mother, Queen Leda, as keeper of the ancient mother-goddess cult increasingly suppressed by the reigning kings, beautiful Helen of Sparta initially fails to hear the Goddess of Heaven’s voice within her. And no wonder—the hormone-bedeviled teenager lusts after handsome Menelaus, whose family has offended the Goddess by looting her temples for bronze. Upon Leda’s death, the Goddess offers Helen the choice of marrying Menelaus at the cost of a life of misery and the destruction of Sparta, or sacrificing him in favor of older, craggy-faced Odysseus—the “wisest among the Achaeans”—with whom Helen would enjoy a long, happy reign as Sparta’s queen. Naturally, Helen chooses Menelaus, and thus follows betrayals, misunderstandings, and intrigues that lead to the destruction of Sparta and Troy. Kidnapped by Paris, forced to marry him and bear sons by his cleverer brother, Deiphobus, Helen concentrates on protecting the hordes who worship her—whether as the Goddess on Earth in Sparta or as Inanna in Troy.

Her efforts to play out the Goddess’s maternal role are at cross purposes with the male rulers’ ambitions, however—and constant misunderstandings result. Herding her subjects out of besieged Sparta, she is accused of abandoning her post. Refusing to abandon her Trojan sons when Menelaus arrives to rescue her, she commits treason. Then, attempting to free the Trojan people from their despotic rulers by allowing the Trojan horse within the city walls, she betrays her Trojan husband.

Kirkus Reviews says of the Helen of Troy novel: “Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.”

If you liked Helen of Troy you will enjoy other novels by Dora Benley including the Julius Caesar: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Medea the Witch, Minotaur, and Cleopatra’s Stone.

Leave a reply

Helen of Troy On Big Christmas Promotion:

Starting tomorrow Helen of Troy will be on special promotion.

First-novelist Dora Benley recounts the fall of Troy from Helen’s point of view—in this spirited page-turner that placed in the National Writers Book Contest.

Though brought up to inherit the role of her mother, Queen Leda, as keeper of the ancient mother-goddess cult increasingly suppressed by the reigning kings, beautiful Helen of Sparta initially fails to hear the Goddess of Heaven’s voice within her. And no wonder—the hormone-bedeviled teenager lusts after handsome Meneleus, whose family has offended the Goddess by looting her temples for bronze. Upon Leda’s death, the Goddess offers Helen the choice of marrying Meneleus at the cost of a life of misery and the destruction of Sparta, or sacrificing him in favor of older, craggy-faced Odysseus—the “wisest among the Achaeans”—with whom Helen would enjoy a long, happy reign as Sparta’s queen. Naturally, Helen chooses Meneleus, and thus follows betrayals, misunderstandings, and intrigues that lead to the destruction of Sparta and Troy. Kidnapped by Paris, forced to marry him and bear sons by his cleverer brother, Deiphobus, Helen concentrates on protecting the hordes who worship her—whether as the Goddess on Earth in Sparta or as Inanna in Troy.

Her efforts to play out the Goddess’s maternal role are at cross purposes with the male rulers’ ambitions, however—and constant misunderstandings result. Herding her subjects out of besieged Sparta, she is accused of abandoning her post. Refusing to abandon her Trojan sons when Meneleus arrives to rescue her, she commits treason. Then, attempting to free the Trojan people from their despotic rulers by allowing the Trojan horse within the city walls, she betrays her Trojan husband.

Kirkus Reviews says of the Helen of Troy novel: “Dora Benley’s portrayal of Helen as supporter of the people and clever, if misunderstood, female in a world of men—as opposed to the more familiar fickle housewife—keeps this classic, action-packed tale bubbling to the last huzzah. An auspicious beginning —and a delightful read.”

If you liked Helen of Troy you will enjoy other novels by Dora Benley including Julius Caesar: A Novel, Medea the Witch, Cleopatra’s Stone, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, and Minotaur.

Leave a reply