Come To The Facebook Party For Julia: A Romance:

Starting at 2PM on the afternoon of Monday, April 8 you are cordially invited to the Facebook Party to celebrate the publication of the romantic historic thriller, Julia: A Romance by Dora Benley. Listen to the debate. Should Sulla and Sisenna be able to enslave the Athenians and make them part of the Roman Empire? Should the Greeks —- particularly the Athenians who produced the Acropolis, the Parthenon and invited democracy —- get some sort of special statue or independent rule? After all, Roman aristocrats considered speaking Greek a kind of higher education. Enter a contest. Win a prize. Get free gifts.

Julia is rushing down the hallway of Marcus Sisenna’s mansion in republican Rome of about 82 BC. The hallway is filled with Greek statues of the classical time period lining the walls on both sides. But on a shelf in front of her she sees a strange two foot statue of a type she has never seen before. She stops cold and stares at it with her hand clapped over her mouth. A bare-chested snake priestess with a flounced skirt has snakes coiling around her arms. She glares straight back at Julia.

Julia has got herself in quite a fix. She is betrothed to be married to the second man in Rome, the righthand man of the Dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla in the 80s BC in Republican Rome. She hates the way Sisenna has been married five times before and is having an affair with her own mother. Her father, coward that he is, has given away her hand in marriage to save his own life and his own estates.

And now here she is poised on the bring of what could be another war. The Greek colonies are in rebellion, and Julia, fiancee of Marcus Sisenna, is a target. What should she do to save her own life? Who can she turn to? Certainly not her own mother or father! The answer may surprise you. It certainly surprises the fair Julia.

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Rodin and Elgin Marbles at the British Museum:

What I wanted to comment on was that last night right before I went to bed I found out that there is to be a major exhibit of Rodin sculptures at the British Museum starting in April and going through July. What is more exciting is that Rodin was inspired by the museum’s collection of marbles from the Parthenon, the Elgin Marbles, when he visited the British Museum in 1881. So there is going to be some sort of joint exhibit. I haven’t heard all the details yet. For one thing, are they going to move the Elgin Marbles to the exhibit room for special exhibitions?

This is the best exhibit I have heard about at the British Museum since at least 2013. I think that was the year of the exhibit on Pompeii at the British Museum. It is certainly the first one about the classics since then.

Have you ever seen the Elgin Marbles? When I was at the British Museum as a kid for some reason that I cannot remember we got lost and never made it past the Rosetta Stone which I remember seeing. I have been to the ruins of the Parthenon once but I have never seen the Marbles.
Cheops Books LLC publishes historical thrillers set in ancient Athens and ancient Greece as well as ancient Rome such as Helen of Troy, the Minotaur, Medea the Witch, and the upcoming novels Caesar’s Lost Legions, and Julia: A Romance.

Rodin and “The Thinker”

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