Cheops Books Offers Lots Of Roman Novels:

Historical novels like just about everything else started in ancient Rome with the publication of a series of Greek Hellenistic novels of the romantic sort. So in tribute to the people of the Tiber River who gave us the column, the arch, St. Peters, the Colosseum, and the Roman Forum, Cheops Books has published a series of thrillers about ancient Rome.

One such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire.

Another such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna. Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Marcus Sulla, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide. But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born. Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

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Saturnalia: Roman Christmas

The ancient Saturnalia was celebrated on December 17 through December 23 to honor the God Saturn. It became the predecessor of our Christmas season with role reversals between master and slave, gift giving, gambling, feasting, It celebrated the winter solstice season or the coming New Year’s.

This festival plays a big role in the Cheops Books LLC novel: Cleopatra’s Stone. But it also would be a festival celebrated by Julia and Sisenna, the main characters of the upcoming historical thriller Julia: A Romance set in Republican Rome of the first century B.C. The Saturnalia would occur during their first winter as a married couple.

Cheops Book LLC publishes a series of ancient novels, including a subset of Roman novels. That includes: Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Julius Caesar: A Novel, and Cleopatra’s Stone found on Amazon. It also includes to be published historical thrillers such as Julia: A Romance, Pliny: A Novel, and Caesar’s Lost Legions.

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Is Socialism Better Than Private Enterprise?

You say that socialism means “sharing the burdens”. I am not sure what you mean by this, but if you mean offering more government programs and services at taxpayer expense, I guess that is where we should begin. BUT is the government really the best entity to offer these services? Do they offer the best quality services? I think NOT. Take the example of public education which is offered by the local and state government in America and by the national government in Paris, France for instance.

That is a good beginning point because it is a common service that we all share whether in America, Britain, or France. I have an MED in English Education which means master’s in English Education at the high school level. My mother was also a high school teacher. I did student teaching and even had a job teaching English for awhile. I came to the conclusion that no matter what they did, public education was always going to be second best. I went to a public grade school and high school. I didn’t learn very much there other than what I taught myself. But when I went to college, which was a private school, I learned much more. But public education remains because it is better than nothing, though it is a shocking burden at the local level because of local property taxes which support the schools.

The previous occupant of the White House was trying to expand the federal government’s reach into health care. All he succeeded in doing was to make it difficult to impossible for real people to buy health insurance plans. He made it so that you can’t even get a doctor to call you back on the phone since there is now a doctor shortage for no good reason except that he made it hard for doctors to have private practices anymore. Health care became second rate. Hopefully Trump’s tax bill which also included a provision to kill the mandate has started to change things.

Not that the government can’t do anything in regard to services. It would be hard to see how public highways could be private. it would be hard to see how the military could be private. However as a footnote, when armies WERE private back during the days of the late Roman Republic you had legendary and famous armies as well as the most famous general in history, Julius Caesar.

Cheops Books LLC publishes various Roman novels such as Livia: A Novel, Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel, Caesar’s Lost Legions, Pliny: A Novel, and Julia: A Romance.

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The Roman Banquet In Classical Times:

The second day of the Roman wedding was often a Roman banquet or reception for the guests which meant feasting. What did the Romans eat?
You might be likely to find them gathered on the couches and sofas around the banqueting table devouring a pork roast the way you would associate with Henry VIII. For the Roman aristocracy liked pork as much as the later day English aristocracy. But alas they did not have forks, which were an invention of later times. They had to content themselves with only spoons and knives. And more than their modern counterparts they ate with their hands.

If they were not serving pork they would probably be serving fish, which was a favorite of Romans. They had their own favorite fish sauce, too. It was called either garum or liquamen. It has often be compared with American ketchup in its popularity.

And what about dessert for the Roman banquet? For the wedding banquet you were not likely to be served a wedding cake. In fact in the aristocratic form of marriage that was reserved for the bridal couple only during the ceremony and was fed to them by the priest in a ceremony resembling what later became the Roman Catholic wedding ceremony. But they were likely to enjoy fruit, honey, and nuts mixed up in some kind of custard or even cookies. And while they ate they were likely to be entertained by jugglers, musicians, acrobats, and actors.

In Julia: A Romance by Dora Benley, and soon to be published by Cheops Books LLC,  you will find a full-scale banquet after the wedding ceremony. This all takes place before Julia and Marcus Sisenna, the groom, depart for a mysterious honeymoon trip to Greece where they will meet untold adventures.

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Preparations For A Roman Wedding:

The bride wore a white woolen dress with a translucent flame yellow veil very much like a Vestal Virgin to show off her virginity. A young boy relative would light the torch of Ceres to guide the wedding procession to the house of the groom. The bride carried a copper coin to give to the Lares of her new neighborhood to show that she would soon be part of it. The bride was greeted by a torch bearer from the groom’s household. Then the bride was carried over the threshhold by her attendants. She was greeted by the groom. They exchanged vows, “Where you are Gaius, I am Gaia.” Frequently a sacrifice took place. The bride and groom held hands. That night the wedding would be consummated. The next day the groom would hold a banquet for his friends.

There was also a confarreatio Roman wedding ceremony reserved for the highest nobility about which we know very little except that it was somehow more religious. It was presided over by the Flamen Dialis and the Pontifex Maximus with ten witnesses present. The bride and groom shared a cake made of spelt.

In every Roman wedding a big deal was made of the date which had to be approved by augurs to make sure that it was lucky. It could determine how the whole marriage would turn out in the future.

Julia: A Romance is an upcoming historical romantic thriller by Dora Benley to be published by Cheops Books LLC. It incorporates a full-scale, lavish Roman wedding.

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Julius Caesar: A Novel: Free On Kindle

In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire. But hurry! This offer won’t be repeated this year.

If you liked this novel you might want to try other titles by Dora Benley including Minotaur, Cleopatra’s Stone, Helen of Troy, Medea the Witch, and Book of the Dead. They are all offered on Amazon Kindle.

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