Old Faithful Plot And Pliny: A Thriller:

Pliny the Elder plays a strange role in Old Faithful Plot. Though he lived 2000 years earlier in time, the famous Roman naturalist and encyclopedia writer becomes inextricably linked with Hitler’s machinations in Yellowstone National Park as he attempts to make the supervolcano explode.

Pliny is escaping his own volcano, Vesuvius in 79AD which is exploding to cover southern Italy in ash. But he is also a statesman who has served as governor in the Roman province of Germany and who has written essays badmouthing the Germans.
Cheops Books LLC will issue a joint edition of the two thriller novels by Dora Benley after Pliny: The Thriller is published. It will be Pliny: The Thriller and Old Faithful Plot.

While they are hiding out from Dora’s husband at the Old Faithful Lodge in 1933, Dora and Edward are also hiding Lawrence maps that Churchill has given them and which Hitler would do anything to get his hands on. Hitler threatens to blow up Yellowstone if they don’t hand over the maps. And Hitler has an even darker plot in store for Pliny.

Pliny the Elder, or Gaius Plinius Secundus, was an ancient Roman scientist, essayist, and thinker, probably the greatest mind of the first century AD. He had an office right next door to what later became the Porta Nigra in Trier.

What was he doing there, hundreds of miles away from his home in Rome? Trier was the oldest Roman city in Germany. He had been appointed Governor of the Province of Germany probably by the Emperor Vespasian and his son, the Emperor Titus. No doubt he studied the birds there as well as the flora and fauna since he was the first to write an encyclopedia called the Natural History, which was influential for centuries.
He was carrying on business as usual here early in the summer of 79AD before packing his bags and returning home for a summer at the seaside south of Rome at one of his villas near the Vesuvius Volcano which unknown to any mortal that summer was about to erupt.

According to legend that is how Pliny died. He was leading an expedition to save those too near the volcano when the volcano sent a rain of ash down upon him. Italian archaeologists now think they may have discovered his remains in a ship in the Bay of Naples near the volcano.

But the novel offers a different explanation for his mysterious disappearance. He was being pursued by German warriors for writing a derisive work about their peoples and culture called the Germania. And that was where Hitler came in.

But did he escape or not? Pliny: The Thriller may present surprising answers. It is the latest book in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series. And what happens at the end of Old Faithful Plot? Only time will tell.

Cheops Books LLC will issue a joint edition of the two thriller novels by Dora Benley after Pliny: The Thriller is published. It will be Pliny: The Thriller and Old Faithful Plot.

Leave a reply

Three Romances By Dora Benley:

Three romances by Dora Benley are available from Cheops Books LLC: Julia: A Romance, Silver Wolf Moon, and Jason and Medea: A Novel.

In Julia: A Romance Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna.

Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide.
But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born.

Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

In Silver Wolf Moon Darcy Devon can’t take it anymore. Her millionaire parents won’t stop bugging her to date Randolph King, the son of an English client of theirs. She runs away to live in her grandparents’ house in the wilds of Montana.

But no sooner does she unpack her suitcase than she notices that somebody who looks like an uncouth madman is following her. Nobody knows who he is. When she goes swimming, somebody is watching her. When she goes to bed, somebody is outside looking in.

Wolves howl at midnight. She looks up at the sky and sees a black moon and shivers. What does this strange dude want with her? Is he escaped from an asylum, or is it something else?

In Jason And Medea: A Novel Princess Medea lives in the dream-like Kingdom of Colchis along the Black Sea. It is the richest land in the world presided over by a gift from the gods, the Golden Fleece. Gold is as plentiful in this land as the sands on the beach.

She and her sister go to do the palace laundry one day and discover a strange ship from a foreign land coming ashore along the Phasis River. Her father holds a banquet, and Medea meets a golden-haired prince from far away. Jason claims he has come here to win the Golden Fleece to take home to Greece with him. He is willing to fight for the Colchians or to buy the Fleece outright.

Medea’s father, King Aeetes, at once summons his guards and warriors and throws the foreigner and his sailors in jail. Medea knows she must save this foreign prince or no one else will. But in order to save him she must betray her father and her people. It is a hard choice for one so young to make. But for Medea there is no turning back.

Leave a reply

Carthage Must Be Destroyed

In Carthage Must Be Destroyed Gaius Antonius is inspired by the leading senator and statesman, Marcus Porcius Cato. He turns his talent for drawing into a map making expedition to Carthage where he manages to ferret out a naval vessel as evidence that the Carthaginians are starting to rebuild their fleet in the aftermath of the Second Punic War. They have finished with the reparations that Rome imposed on them, and now have money to spare.

He and his mentor Cato return to the Roman Senate to get them to declare war when the map disappears. Gaius must chase the Carthaginian Princess Tanit across the Mediterranean and meet all sorts of unexpected hardships.

Will he make it in time, or will Princess Tanit and her relatives gain the upper hand against them? Find out in Carthage Must Be Destroyed by Dora Benley.

Leave a reply

Two More Thrillers To Come From Cheops Books LLC:

Cheops Books LLC will soon publish two more historical thrillers by Dora Benley, Inn at the Crossroads and Pliny: A Novel.

Lizette receives an urgent missive from her mother and sister. They need rescued. The British under the Duke of Wellington are invading Waterloo in preparation for the Battle.

When Lizette gets to Waterloo, she finds that her mother and sister have fled to Brussels. The crazy Duchess of Richmond has decided to have a grand ball on the eve of the battle, the soldiers be damned. Her mother and sister, seamstresses, are sewing ballgowns for the event.

Gaston, Lizette’s husband’s only son at the Inn at the Crossroads, shows up and threatens his stepmother. He will drag her home if she does not get information for the cause of the Emperor Napoleon. She is to dance with the British officers, including Edward Ware’s great-grandfather, and report to him. But little does Gaston realize the complications that he has created.

Lizette is arrested and thrown in jail as a spy. Will Gaston be able to rescue her? Will he be able to help Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo? Read Inn at the Crossroads, a romantic historical thriller.

Who was Pliny the Elder?

Pliny the Elder, or Gaius Plinius Secundus, was an ancient Roman scientist, essayist, and thinker, probably the greatest mind of the first century AD. He had an office right next door to what later became the Porta Nigra in Trier.

What was he doing there, hundreds of miles away from his home in Rome? Trier was the oldest Roman city in Germany. He had been appointed Governor of the Province of Germany probably by the Emperor Vespasian and his son, the Emperor Titus. No doubt he studied the birds there as well as the flora and fauna since he was the first to write an encyclopedia called the Natural History, which was influential for centuries.

He was carrying on business as usual here early in the summer of 79 AD before packing his bags and returning home for a summer at the seaside south of Rome at one of his villas near the Vesuvius Volcano which unknown to any mortal that summer was about to erupt.

According to legend that is how Pliny died. He was leading an expedition to save those too near the volcano when the volcano sent a rain of ash down upon him. Italian archaeologist now think they may have discovered his remains in a ship in the Bay of Naples near the volcano. See article on the website.

But the novel offers a different explanation for his mysterious disappearance. He was being pursued by German warriors for writing a derisive work about their peoples and culture called the Germania.

But did he escape or not? Pliny: A Novel may present surprising answers. It is the latest book in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series.

Leave a reply

More War Novels To Be Published By Cheops Books LLC:

Cheops Books LLC will soon publish two more books in the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series, Unlocking Trinity and Caesar’s Lost Legions, both by Dora Benley.

In Unlocking Trinity the Ware’s little girl has been kidnapped by Hitler and forced to live with him at the Berghof. But when Hitler commits suicide in his Berlin Bunker on April 30, 1945, what happens to the child who has been indoctrinated as a Nazi, who has forgotten that English is her native language?

Her biological father, General Lord Edward Ware, must defy Eisenhower’s order to leave Berlin to the Russians. He must get to her before Stalin’s henchwoman does. It becomes a race to Trinity in the wilds of New Mexico in the birth trauma of the Cold War.

In Caesar’s Lost Legions Caesar Augustus has sent Caelius Antonius to the Roman province of Germania in 9 AD to draw a map of wonders that will lead the legions to a promised land as far East as the River Elbe. There are reports of a a sea port that would serve as a highway to lands as yet unnamed.

Augustus ward, Arminius, a model German turned Roman, has volunteered to lead the legions of Varus there. Caelius awakens one night to find a symbol of Thor’s hammer engraved in the tree bark outside his tent. He senses a spy from some disaffected tribe watching him. He reports the spy to Varus who defers to Arminius. Arminius says that all the Germans are of course watching, delighted that the Romans have come to civilize their benighted country.

Evidence builds of a conspiracy. Caelius reports it to Augustus back in Rome personally. But Augustus refuses to listen. Arminius was his ward who had lived in his house in Rome, and Caesar had never had a son of his own. Arminius was his blind spot. As a warning to Caelius, Caelius’s wife is kidnapped. No matter what Caelius must defend his maps to the death. They hold the key to Rome’s future. He hopes that neither he nor his wife must die to realize it.

Join Edward’s long ago ancestor, Caelius, in his adventures on the far frontiers of the Roman Empire in Germany. They echo the adventures his latter day descendant, Edward Ware, will someday face in his own map plots against the latter-day Germans.

Leave a reply

Julia: A Romance Gets Two Reviews On Goodreads:

Julia: A Romance by Dora Benley was just published by Cheops Books LLC on April 9. That was the date that the Goodreads Giveaway distributed one hundred free copies of the Kindle edition of the historical romantic thriller. Two reviews have since that date been posted on Goodreads.

Kayla Tornello wrote, “I enjoyed this book’s setting in ancient Rome, although the characters seemed rather on the modern side at times. The main character, Julia, is reluctant to marry Sisenna. This creates drama, but it gets rather tedious at times. Also, the romance part only comes at the very end of the story. Perhaps I would have liked this book better if I had been a younger reader. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Yay!”
Mary on Goodreads also posted her review, “Wonderful romance!”

The novel Julia: A Romance may be on your reading list soon.

Leave a reply

Bronze Age Sheep Straight From Caelius’s Estate Outside Londinium:

Caelius Antonius, the hero of the upcoming historical thriller by Dora Benley Caesar’s Lost Legions, might have had a sheep like this in ancient Britain. It is wandering around a Bronze Age burial mound from long before Caelius’s time in pre-Roman Britain. The breed is called Welsh Badger Faced, and this is a ram. Such atmosphere!

Caesar Augustus has sent Caelius Antonius to the Roman province of Germania in 9 AD to draw a map of wonders that will lead the legions to a promised land as far East as the River Elbe. There are reports of a a sea port that would serve as a highway to lands as yet unnamed.

Augustus ward, Arminius, a model German turned Roman, has volunteered to lead the legions of Varus there. Caelius awakens one night to find a symbol of Thor’s hammer engraved in the tree bark outside his tent. He senses a spy from some disaffected tribe watching him. He reports the spy to Varus who defers to Arminius. Arminius says that all the Germans are of course watching, delighted that the Romans have come to civilize their benighted country.

Evidence builds of a conspiracy. Caelius reports it to Augustus back in Rome personally. But Augustus refuses to listen. Arminius was his ward who had lived in his house in Rome, and Caesar had never had a son of his own. Arminius was his blind spot.

As a warning to Caelius, Caelius’s wife is kidnapped. No matter what Caelius must defend his maps to the death. They hold the key to Rome’s future. He hopes that neither he nor his wife must die to realize it.

Join Caelius in his adventures on the far frontiers of the Roman Empire in Germany. They echo the adventures his latter day descendant Edward Ware will someday face in his own map plots against the latter-day Germans.

Leave a reply

Cato Looms Like A Giant Over The Novel:

Cato the Elder was Roman who almost singlehandledly commanded the Third Punic War. He brought it about with his perpetual speeches “Carthage must be destroyed” in the Roman Senate House and showing off crops and goods that supposedly came from that city along the coast of North Africa to warn the Romans how close by it was located.

He owned a vast latifundia in the countryside outside Rome. He experimented with various crops such as grapes, olives, and livestock and wrote a Latin prose work On Farming, influencing Latin literature. He also wrote Latin prose works that have not survived such as the first history of Rome that we know about called Origines. He also composed an encyclopedia and a book of maxims, neither of which survive except in fragments. He might have been a Pliny the Elder two centuries earlier in Roman history.

He is certainly the one historical character whose personality looms largest over the Dora Benley historical thriller Carthage Must Be Destroyed. It will soon be published by Cheops Books LLC.

Leave a reply

Carthage Must Be Destroyed Book Cover:

Carthage Must Be Destroyed is the latest in a series of historical thriller novels by Dora Benley about the long ago ancestors of Colonel Sir Edward Ware, or General Lord Edward Ware, of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series about World War 1 and World War 2. Colonel Ware lives outside Salisbury, England, of recent notoriety with the Russian chemical attacks. He lives at his estate called Ware Hall which has been inhabited by his family since Roman times when his ancestor Lucius Antonius fled to Britain after Julius Caesar was assassinated.

Cato the Elder ended every speech in the Roman Senate with the words, “Carthage must be destroyed.” He was a survivor of the Second Punic War fifty years before. Hannibal won the Battle of Cannae and almost marched on Rome itself. He reminded the Romans that Carthage had finished paying its reparations and was now refurbishing its navy. It could sail against them again just as Hannibal himself had crossed the Alps a generation before.

The son of another senator, Gaius Antonius, is picked by Cato to follow him to Carthage to assess the situation. Gaius Antonius sketches the harbor. His eyes light on a ship that is being built. It looks like the finest of its fleet.

When Cato orders the Carthaginians to send one hundred hostages picked from the youth of the noble families of Carthage to Rome to be kept at his latifundia estate, the Princess Tanit arrives. She tries to charm everyone —- for awhile. But soon she and the sketches and maps that Gaius Antonius drew suddenly disappear along with all the hostages.

This sets off a multi-nation chase to get the drawings and maps back again. Cato wants to show the drawing of the fine naval vessel and the threats it represents to the Roman Senate. They are on the verge of declaring war, and Cato and Gaius Antonius want to push them over the edge. Will they make it in time, or will the Carthaginians gain an advantage? Will Princess Tanit and her cohorts escape, or will they get their just deserts?

Find out. Read Carthage Must Be Destroyed coming soon from Cheops Books LLC. This is a sketch of the cover drawn by artist Daniel Teran.

Leave a reply

Trump Listened To Only Half Of Crassus’s Advice:

Marcus Licinius Crassus was friends with the greatest military general of all times, Gaius Julius Caesar. So he ought to know what he was talking about when he gave advice to Donald Trump in the White House. What were they talking about? Syria, of course, and how to respond to the recent chemical attack.

Crassus has been living at the White House in the Lincoln bedroom since early 2017 when he moved in for the first time in 2000 years. He liked Trump and wished him well. He was after all, another mogul, another businessman, who wanted to get involved in politics just like Crassus in the first century B.C. when the Republic was busting up and turning into the Empire.
Crassus reportedly told Trump to do something sneaky. How Trump got bogged down in having international organizations certify that the Syrian President was responsible for the chemical attack on civilians, no one can guess. Crassus had not doubt told him that such a technique would be good if he were trying to hide what he was really doing a la Julius Caesar style.

Caesar once pretended that he was withdrawing his troops from Alexandria. He had certain ships load up supplies and pretend to be sailing back to Rome. Instead of attacking the palace where Cleopatra’s brother was holed up, he decided to feast and make merry in the harbor, dining before all his troops. Cleopatra’s brother decided that Caesar was a coward and ordered a banquet in celebration. After all the Egyptian troops got drunk, then Caesar attacked the Palace and took it with hardly a Roman casualty.

How could Trump emulate that? Well, after he called an international body into Syria and everybody thought he was too cowardly to attack by himself, he should order an air strike in Iran because they are helping to support the corrupt Syrian regime. Or perhaps he should even try to use a smart bomb to get Putin himself in his marble palace hidden away from view. That would be a biggie!

But if Trump has misinterpreted all his good advice from Crassus, it is very sad. But then American Presidents never were Roman generals, now were they?

Leave a reply