Future Edward Ware Thrillers Novels:

Future Edward Ware Thrillers at War Novels in the series include Wall Street Swastika and Murder at Hamlet’s Castle soon to be published by Cheops Books LLC.

In Wall Street Swastika Edward and Dora are smooching it up in a tryst at the Waldorf Astoria in 1929. Edward is on leave from British Mid East Headquarters, and Dora is absconding from her tyrannical husband, Michael Byrne.

Suddenly they hear shouting on the street. New York City is in pandemonium. The center of the action is Wall Street. They rush over to find their friend and compatriot Winston Churchill watching all his investments disappear as stocks crash on October 29 on Black Tuesday. Other investors are leaping out the windows.

They sail back to Britain, commiserating with each other about hiding the Lawrence maps. Hitler has suddenly become more aggressive about demanding the key to world domination. He feels more powerful now that the world seems to be ending.

As soon as the board they run into His Majesty, the Prince of Wales. Hitler’s agents are courting him for financial support to help fund his rise to power in the face of the world wide depression following the crash and the failure of capitalism. His Majesty is sympathetic towards the Nazis and is about to commit a hug royal faux pas. Winston, Edward, and Dora must race to stop him before they reach Europe. Otherwise as the clock ticks nothing will stop Hitler’s rise to ultimate power.

After narrowly escaping the von Wessels, Hitler’s chief spies, in Santa Fe while on leave from Mid East Quarters in Cairo, Edward and Dora don’t know where to go next and where to hide the Lawrence maps, key to world domination. In Murder at Hamlet’s Castle, they have just been watching a production of Hamlet when they get a note from Winston Churchill. He says that he and Clemmie got locked in the dungeon of Hamlet’s Castle in Helsingor, Denmark. It was where the Danish army used to be billeted in the Middle Ages. Churchill and Clemmie had to raise Hamlet’s ghost screaming to be let out.

It just occurred to Winston it would be a perfect location to hide the much sought after military maps. No one would ever suspect they were there — and if they did they would never be able to escape with their lives let alone the prize that Hitler has been seeking for years.
But after a huge chase scene to get away from states they meet unexpected obstacles in the castle in 1934. The mistress who keeps the place up turns out to be the perfect Nazi spy in cahoots with Hitler and the von Wessels. Once again Dora and Edward need to escape.

But this time they meet an unexpected ally in the famous Dane himself, Shakespeare’s most famous character. They uncover Hamlet’s secret notebooks that tell them just what they need to know. Others were cornered in this castle long ago. Hamlet tells them how he escaped in a tale that upsets all previous notions of the man, his character, and his fate.

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Hamlet Is A Big Subject For Dora Benley:

Dora Benley not only likes to write novels about ancient Rome and Greece, she is also fond of Shakespeare and Hamlet. Two of her recent novels have concerned themselves with Hamlet. Just last week she published the YA thriller Ophelia Plot about a girl who was kidnapped while she was putting on Hamlet on the high school stage. Yet to be published is the Edward Ware Thrillers at War novel Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Dora and Edward are attending a performance of Hamlet when they get a note from Churchill. They have to make their way to Hamlet’s Castle in Denmark where they are supposed to hide the Lawrence maps.

After narrowly escaping the von Wessels, Hitler’s chief spies, in Santa Fe while on leave from Mid East Quarters in Cairo, Edward and Dora don’t know where to go next and where to hide the Lawrence maps, key to world domination. They have just been watching a production of Hamlet when they get a note from Winston Churchill. He says that he and Clemmie got locked in the dungeon of Hamlet’s Castle in Helsingor, Denmark. It was where the Danish army used to be billeted in the Middle Ages. They had to raise Hamlet’s ghost screaming to be let out. It just occurred to Winston it would be a perfect location to hide the much sought after military maps. No one would ever suspect they were there — and if they did they would never be able to escape with their lives let alone the prize that Hitler has been seeking for years.

But after a huge chase scene to get away from states they meet unexpected obstacles in the castle in 1934. The mistress who keeps the place up turns out to be the perfect Nazi spy in cahoots with Hitler and the von Wessels. Once again they need to escape. But this time they meet an unexpected ally in the famous Dane himself, Shakespeare’s most famous character. They uncover Hamlet’s secret notebooks that tell them just what they need to know. Others were cornered in this castle long ago. Hamlet tells them how he escaped in a tale that upsets all previous notions of the man, his character, and his fate.

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Hamlet v. Fortinbras: The Real Conflict Of Hamlet:

Yes, people think that gloomy, cloudy, rainy weather where you rarely see the sun would be ideal for Hamlet. This certainly fits Shakespeare’s hero, but what if there were an historic Hamlet who was different? It might not be ideal for him. After all, Hamlet’s kingdom, poised on the sea with Sweden only miles away across the straits where Fortinbras ruled, was under siege and attack. (I think it makes more sense than having Fortinbras be from Norway). That might have been the real reason that Hamlet’s father had been killed instead of an incestuous murder plot on the part of his uncle who wanted to marry Hamlet’s mother. And of course the prince has to take over for his father and fight Fortinbras who is the real enemy of the piece instead of just some foreign monarch who wanders on the stage at the end and finds the Danish court all dead. In other words someone should have written the famous tragedy as the conflict between Hamlet and Fortinbras.

Another important point is that Hamlet is obviously a Viking type. Fortinbras would also be a Viking. They would live in a world of warfare by sea. If Shakespeare were true to type, he would have the Danish Prince from Elsinore revving up his long boats. Supposedly a more recent author named John Updike tried his hand at the story. He more recently wrote a novel called Gertrude and Claudius emphasizing the Viking the connection.

These new conflicts and perspectives are all incorporated in the upcoming Cheops Books LLC historical thriller, Murder at Hamlet’s Castle.

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English: The Language of Shakespeare and the Edward Ware Thrillers:
I don’t know the exact rules either, but I heard from an academic who was studying the subject that the Republic of Ireland requires students to learn Gaelic, and Northern Ireland offers it as an elective. It would probably be more useful at this point to learn Latin than Gaelic even though that is also a dead language. Latin has more ties with English and the evolution of English and other major European languages such as French, Spanish, and Italian. And dead language though it be it has more classics written in that language than Gaelic does. Even major poets who supposed Irish independence such as William Butler Yeats wrote in English. Many of them knew Latin, too.
Unfortunately I agree with the two chaps who were fans of British cricket who were traveling on the train in Hitchcock’s movie The Lady Vanishes. The station attendant was calling out trains in all sorts of languages first. Finally he got to English. The two chaps quipped, “Well, why didn’t he say that to begin with?” I always support having everybody learn English. You could even make up a humorous rejoinder to the German question, “What’s wrong with the Germans?” The answer would be of course than they don’t speak better English.
English is the language of Shakespeare, not only the greatest writer of English but also of any language. It is fortunately also the language of the Edward Ware Thrillers at War Series including Key to Lawrence Special Edition, Dark Horse, Captive at the Berghof, and soon the Salisbury Plot. The hero of the series, Colonel Sir Edward Ware, was the old-fashioned British sort who would never have questioned speaking English. He thought that was what he was fighting for in the Second World War.

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William Shakespeare is not only the most famous English writer of all times, he is frequently considered to be the greatest writer who ever existed in the whole world. But did he really exist? Was his name really William Shakespeare? Or was Shakespeare merely a pen name to conceal his real identity? There was a William Shakespeare who was a businessman at the time, who bought New Place at Stratford upon Avon. But was he a patron of the artists or a writer? Did the real writer just borrow his name? And why did he want to conceal himself? In the past people have suggested that he might have been close to the royal court and thus wanted not to be known for political reasons. But whoever he was the mystery he leaves behind is intriguing and has become the subject of the upcoming Edward Ware Thrillers novel, Murder at Hamlet’s Castle.

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Edward Ware Thrillers Newsletter December 2016
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to All.

Christmas Special:
Would you like an audio book version of Captive at the Berghof: Part 1 or Part 2 or perhaps Dark Horse? Would you like to find out if the Wares get their daughter, Thomasina, back from Hitler? Or how the election of 1940 turns out in the alternative history scenario of Dark Horse? If so Cheops Books LLC has a free giveaway for the first fifteen people to respond. Use the Contact us form on the website to let us know your preference. We will give you the code you need to check it out for free on Audible.

All Cheops Books LLC titles are for sale as Kindle ebooks on Amazon.com. But they are not available on Amazon as paperbacks. Starting in 2017 you will be able to get paperback editions of selected books right on our website. You will see that a BUY NOW button has been inserted next to the lucky title chose for this promotion. You will be able to buy the titles using your PayPal account. Or if you wish you will be able to buy selected paperbacks on lulu.com.

Purchase Dark Horse from Cheops Books:

Even selected ebooks will be available on lulu.com as an alternative to Amazon if you prefer.
Pack your bags for Denmark in the New Year. That is what Dora and Edward must do when they are attacked during a Shakespeare performance and must flee and hide the Lawrence maps in a place of ill omen, Hamlet’s Castle in Elsinore. Look for Murder at Hamlet’s Castle, coming soon from Cheops Books, LLC.

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Reaction to University of Pennsylvania Removal of Shakespeare Portrait: Supposedly the students at the University of Pennsylvania removed Shakespeare’s portrait from the hallway of the Fisher-Bennett Hall in the name of diversity and replaced it with a photo of a black gay poet, Audre Lorde. If I were running the department, I would remove the students first. They don’t seem to be worthy to graduate from a one-time prestigious institution.

What is wrong with what they did? First of all, Shakespeare is a well-established writer to say the least. “Modern and diverse” is not important. What is important is what has survived the test of the ages, or rather history. If you want to celebrate a black poet, put up a portrait or a bust of Pushkin, the very famous Russian writer. If you want a Lesbian poet, take the most famous of all —- Sappho from ancient Greece. They have survived the test of time. Audre Lorde has not.
This emphasis nowadays on what is contemporary is anti-intellectual and anti-scholarly, and that is what universities are supposed to be about.

Cheops Books LLC will publish an upcoming novel about Shakespeare, Murder in Hamlet’s Castle.

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Hamlet is Shakespeare’s longest play. Did you ever get tired of all that lack of action, that constant lamenting, that constant to be or not to be stuff? Did you ever wish Hamlet had been an action hero instead with a whole new face and purpose? Well, you have to look no farther than Murder in Hamlet’s Castle to be published by Cheops Books LLC.

hamlet

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Denmark is not a land of castles. Perhaps it is too flat. We usually think of castles sitting up on hills or at least hillocks. England has far more spooky medieval edifices. But Denmark has at least one very infamous castle by the name of Kronborg in the town of Helsingor by the sea. It is about one hour from Copenhagen and promises all sorts of spooky adventures to anyone brave enough to enter the doors and visit where Hamlet once roamed and Hamlet’s ghost once haunted the stone walls. Cheops Books LLC will visit Kronborg in the upcoming thriller Murder at Hamlet’s Castle. Hopefully it will sell as many copies as Dan Brown.

kronborg_set_fra_soesiden_-foto_thomas_rahbek_kronborg

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