Julia: A Romance: Goodreads Giveaway Opens Today:

Today the Goodreads Giveaway began for the Dora Benley historical romantic thriller Julia: A Romance. The giveaway will continue from today until Monday, April 9 when the prizes will be awarded. 51 people have already entered the contest on the first day. Will you join them? Be one of the first to receive and read the new novel about romance in Republican Rome.

Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna. Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Marcus Sulla, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide. But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born. Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

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Cheops Books Offers Lots Of Roman Novels:

Historical novels like just about everything else started in ancient Rome with the publication of a series of Greek Hellenistic novels of the romantic sort. So in tribute to the people of the Tiber River who gave us the column, the arch, St. Peters, the Colosseum, and the Roman Forum, Cheops Books has published a series of thrillers about ancient Rome.

One such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. In old age and in exile Servilia, mother of Marcus Brutus, awaited the suicide order from the Emperor Augustus, Caesar’s heir, who put to death all of Julius Caesar’s enemies. But instead he asked her to return to Rome and advise him as she once advised his predecessor, whose mistress she was. He wanted her to help raise the daughter of her old enemy Cleopatra, whom he brought back from Egypt after the death of the Serpent of the Nile: “Rome … that great maw of cites, the eater of men that ground and chewed up lives as if they were mere sandy grit between its teeth and then spat them out again. Through endless cycles of the seasons, revolutions, civil wars, and lives always the same. Did I have enough strength in this feeble body to war with her again? The child looked up at me. The answer was on my lips.”

See what you think of this historical thriller from the point of view of Servilia, Julius Caesar’s lifelong friend and mistress. She provides her own perspective on the colossus among men caught between the Republican faction of old Rome and those longing for empire.

Another such novel is Julius Caesar: A Novel. Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna. Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Marcus Sulla, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide. But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born. Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

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Knossos And Julia: A Romance:

When Julia marries Marcus Sisenna through an arranged marriage that her father, Senator Rufus, brokered, she had no idea about all the new experiences and responsibilities that she is taking on. She goes from being a girl who liked to sit in her father’s library in their expansive house on Palatine Hill in Rome to a woman of the world. Just as the Roman Empire extended to the boundaries of the known world, so would Julia’s new horizons.

The man she is marrying is the second most powerful man in Rome, Marcus Sisenna, Sulla’s right-hand man. When there is a plot Sisenna is immediately put in charge of investigating it. The Greeks rebel, so they end up in Greece. Since Sulla had just conquered Athens, the natives are restless.

Julia finds herself in the Palace of Knossos of all places! She can see bare chested priestesses with flounced skirts depicted in statuary. Whispers go on around her, the voices of the rebels.

Take your armchair tour of Greece and the Roman world. Read Julia: A Romance next year.

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The Carthaginian City of Nora:

In Julia: A Romance the heroine encounters various challenges from different sources. One of the biggest challenges comes from her future husband’s position in the empire and his travels. He insists that she learn Greek but he won’t say why at first. Nor will he tell her the important part to be played in the plot of intrigue by cities such as the Carthaginian city of Nora.

At the time of the novel, 82BC, Rome has just put an end to the first civil war between Marius and Sulla with Sulla’s victory. Sulla, the Dictator of Rome, has also just conquered the city state of Athens. Sisenna mentions to Julia that certain disaffected Roman aristocrats had recently been sent to a kind of exile on Sardinia near the ancient city of Nora. It is one of the many colorful locales that plays a part in the novel. In a sense the historical thriller takes in locations all over the ancient Greek and Roman world.

Julia: A Romance by Dora Benley will be published next year by Cheops Books LLC.

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Greece Plays A Role In Julia: A Romance:

Sulla conquered Athens in 87 and 86BC. A stream of slaves was sent to Rome to fill the houses of the patricians with tutors, governesses, and secretaries. For the Greeks were known to be better educated than other slaves from other countries. And in fact Greek was considered a prestigious language that only aristocratic Romans spoke. To have a higher education back then meant to go to Athens and enroll in a school of philosophy or rhetoric.

But the Greeks were troublesome and likely to create plots and revolutions, too. Marcus Sisenna, Sulla’s right-hand lieutenant and political ally in Julia: A Romance, must help to ferret out the origins of a Greek conspiracy rife in Rome at the time of his dictatorship. Delphi becomes a hotbed of rebellion along with the island of Crete and the Palace of Knossos. Who knows where it ends? Look for Julia: A Romance next year from Cheops Books LLC.

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Julia: A Novel Special Free Promotion Today:

Get your free copy of Julia: A Novel on Amazon Kindle today and for the next five days through the weekend. But hurry! This offer won’t be repeated this year.
Julia has every reason to wish that she had not been born the daughter of a Roman senator during the Roman Civil Wars of Marius and Sulla. Her father, Rufus, is trying to escape the proscriptions lists and save his life by betrothing his only daughter in marriage to Marcus Sisenna. Marcus Sisenna is the right hand man of Marcus Sulla, one of the leading men of Rome of the day. Rufus needs his armies and the protection both Sulla and Sisenna can provide. But Julia does not want to marry a man who has already had five wives and who is just marrying her for her father’s money and estates. She does not want to be added to his collection of trophies. Julia wants personal happiness despite the time period into which she has been born. Her father thinks only of keeping his wealth and estates together. Her divorced mother is interested only in her own lovers. To whom shall Julia turn for assistance? The answer may surprise you. For it is obviously just the opposite of what the desperate Julia might expect.

If you liked Julia: A Novel you might also like other Greek and Roman novels by Dora Benley. She has also published: Book of the Dead, Minotaur, Medea the Witch, Helen of Troy, Julius Caesar: A Novel, Cleopatra’s Stone, and Caesar and Cleopatra: A Novel.

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Julia: A Novel by Dora Benley:

Julia: A Novel, another ancient thriller by Dora Benley, will be offered free on Amazon for the next five days starting on Wednesday, July 12 and continuing through the weekend. But hurry! This offer won’t be repeated this year.

Senator Gaius Julius Rufus was unlucky to be born during the first period of the Civil Wars that tore apart not only Rome but Italy into two factions, populares and optimates. He was sixty years old in May of 81 B.C., having spent most of his adulthood in Rome away from his grape and olive vineyards attempting to remain neutral and friendly with both factions while not doing much for either.

His rank and family made his efforts fruitless. He was a senator, an aristocrat. Worse yet, he was a member of the ancient and illustrious clan claiming descent from Aeneas and his mother Venus — the Julii. During the civil war between Marius and Sulla his daughter, Julia’s, life is at stake as well as her heart pining over the man she really loves and cannot have. What can he do to save her? Find out in this historical novel about the days of ancient Rome.

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