Debate Questions For Old Faithful Affair:

Here is the substance of the debate that took place today at 10AM. Want to see the fascinating photos? Go to the website at http://www.edwardwarethrillers.org. Click on Old Faithful Affair Debate.

1)How likely is the Yellowstone supervolcano to blow in the near future?

Linda Lacey: I hope not very soon.

Professor Evans: Yellowstone is a seething, supervolcano with active forces beneath the earth’s surface. What we know of the park is merely a caldera of a giant, ancient and yet still active volcano for sure. Someday it will explode with catastrophic results. But the odds of it going off anytime soon are very low.

Linda Lacey: But if it is that dangerous how do you know?

Professor Evans: Geologic time is much longer than human history. All of human history is just a blip. What we think of as a long time is nothing. In fact current superintendent of Yellowstone is more afraid of Old Faithful ceasing to erupt when he is superintendent than the chance of the park blowing up.

2)Could Hitler have engineered an eruption?

Linda Lacey: I bet he could have. He did everything else bad and evil.

Professor Evans: There is no known way to engineer a volcanic eruption. There has been much discussion and even experiments. But nothing has resulted from it yet.

Linda Lacey: Is is the realm of fiction?

Professor Evans: Exactly. That is what you encounter in the alternative history thriller, Old Faithful Affair.

3)What would Pliny the Elder have thought of Hitler? Is there evidence over 2000 years?

Linda Lacey: How could there be?

Professor Evans: Pliny the Elder was one of the chief Roman intellectuals and learned men. He wrote the first of all encyclopedias used for hundreds of years afterwards and referred to by people as late as the eighteenth century. Jefferson admired him for instance.

Linda Lacey: Pliny wasn’t one of the Founding Fathers!

Professor Evans: He could have been as far as learning goes. And despite being a Roman we have plenty of evidence he would never have approved of Hitler or any tyrant or dictator.

Linda Lacey: But wait a minute! In the first century AD when Pliny lived, emperors ruled Rome. They were dictators and tyrants. So what do you mean?

Professor Evans: Pliny laid low and wrote only about leaves and plants during the reign of Nero. He did not want to attract attention to himself. But the Spanish Emperor Vespasian was a personal friend of his and patron of the arts and learning as was his son and successor Titus, another friend of Pliny. He believed in enlightened despots.

Linda Lacey: That isn’t what Americans believe in. There aren’t any Emperors here, not even kings.

Professor Evans: No, but for a Roman in antiquity that was pretty advanced. It was before the Industrial Revolution, before the Reformation, and before everything necessary to create democracy and capitalism. All they could hope for was enlightened despots. Otherwise they thought they had the rule of the mob.

Linda Lacey: I’m glad I didn’t live back then.

4)Why didn’t the Romans defeat the Germans in ancient times?

Linda Lacey: They seemed to defeat everybody else.

Professor Evans: The Romans didn’t devote the resources to defeating the Germans in ancient times. They thought the Germans were like the Gauls, easy to conquer and civilize. They expected them to grow grapes along the banks of the Rhine and perhaps further East the Elbe, too, as they had taught them to do. They were surprised when the Germans under Arminius attacked their legions in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in 9 AD and slaughtered them. Ever after they never advanced the borders of the Roman Empire past the Rhine.

Linda Lacey: I thought the Romans were really good at conquering tribes and stuff.

Professor Evans: The Germans were also good at imitating military techniques that they learned from the Romans. That is what Arminius did. He learned from the Romans and then betrayed them.

Linda Lacey: I thought the Romans were really good at conquering tribes and stuff. The Romans wouldn’t take an insult sitting down.

Professor Evans: Yes, they sent Germanicus to get the Romans’ revenge in 14AD under Tiberius. But they didn’t stay. They retreated to the Rhine and the Moselle and remained there for the rest of antiquity.

 

Leave a reply

Dora and Edward Hit Rome:

I don’t think Dora and Edward Ware ever visited Rome on one of their wild forays into defending the Lawrence maps from Hitler. But if they did get themselves into such a plot might it go like this?
They would arrive by cruise ship, of course, at the port of Citavecchia. They would be met by a private car which would whisk them into Rome in about one and a half hours. They would want a half-private, half-public place to meet their contact as as not to seem suspicious. The Borghese Gallery might be just the place. At least it is a place to escape the hot sun and all those prying eyes out on the street corner.

They might hire a guide named Giovanni to serve as a cover. While they talked to their contact the guide would be giving them a tour of all the art works in the Borghese Gallery. He would be loud enough their conversation could not be overheard by others in the same room. They could pause in front of statues such as Daphne Fleeing Apollo and nod while Edward took notes.

After about an hour of this their guide and private car could drive them to a carefully chosen restaurant on the third or foruth floor directly across the street from the Colosseum, a restaurant such as Aroma. While sipping top notch Italian wine they could communicate by writing notes and passing them across the table to each other while the guide narrated loudly about the history of the edifice commissioned by Vespasian in 72 BC looming up in front of them.

When done with their meal Dora could pretend that she just had to have another Italian leather handbag. The driver would take them to the top shopping street in town such as the via del Corso. While she handed over a pile of Italian lira, she could be passing a note to a contact in Rome. Then Dora and Edward would be seamlessly transported back to Citavecchia to sail away from Italy and back to England.

Dora and Edward Ware are the two main characters of the Edward Ware Thrillers At War Series of historical thrillers that start during World War 1 and continue through the end of World War 2 with just a peek at what their life after the war might be like in a special supplement to the last novel in the series, Unlocking Trinity. Cheops Books LLC will publish the first volume in the series later this year as Paris Peace Plot. They will also publish Armistice Plot since 100 years ago was the end of World War 1.

Leave a reply

Trump and Titus: 2000 Years of the Jews in Europe:

Yesterday when Trump was making a speech on the White House steps about his tax cut and congressmen and senators were standing on the stairs, it was reminiscent of the days of ancient Rome when generals had triumphs. In particular I am thinking of the famous triumph of Titus who was then the son of the Emperor Vespasian in the year 70 BC. He defeated the Jews in the First Jewish Roman War and sent them off into the Diaspora from which they did not return until after World War 2 almost two thousand years later. The famous Titus’s Arch which still stands in Rome today depicts this event.

Today the UN took a vote whether to condemn the US for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. All of the membership of the EU, the western European countries, voted to condemn the US and Israel. Western Europe is showing its long, long tradition of anti-Semitism. Japan also voted to condemn showing that it was once part of the Axis Powers in World War 2, allied with the Nazis and Hitler.

America is trying to right the historic wrong that has gone on for two thousand years. Not that the Diaspora did not contribute greatly to Jewish civilization in making them the democratic country they are now today. But it is time to let them go home again after two thousand years.
The great mystery in the vote was England. All the other Anglo countries either voted with the US or abstained. But England voted to condemn the resolution to make Jerusalem the capital of Israel and to have the US put its embassy there. Yet it was England who promulgated the Balfour Declaration one hundred years ago, starting the movement that ended up creating the modern state of Israel. England has been in decline for a century from the power it once was, but this shows that it is slipping into the orbit of Germany and other continental countries and losing its own ideals that once made it great.

But at least Trumps stands on the White House steps looking like a Roman of old. Now that the Jews are no longer fractious and rebellious the way they were two thousand years ago, he is saying to go home again.

Cheops Books LLC will soon publish an historical thriller involving Titus. It is called Pliny: A Novel. The encyclopedia writer Pliny was a friend of the Emperor Titus and his father Vespasian.

Leave a reply

On The Road Again In Tarraco
Will you see Cheops Books LLC this summer on the ramparts in the northeastern region of Spain’s Catalonia right along the coast in this ancient port city? This was once the Roman colony of Tarraco. You can stand in a picturesque amphitheater facing the sea. You can hear the waves crash. You can walk along the ramparts with a view either into the city or out towards the Mediterranean.
The Romans colonized Spain early on even during the Republic and called it Hispania. The second group of Roman emperors immediately after the Julio-Claudians hailed from Hispania. Vespasian was a great friend of Pliny the Elder, a main character in Cheops Books’s upcoming historical thriller, Vesuvius Plot. He was also great friends with his son and successor Titus, the conqueror of Jerusalem and the Emperor at the time of the eruption of Vesuvius. Titus appears as a character in the Pliny novel. Pliny spent a lot of his time abroad serving as the governor of various provinces including Germania where he was headquartered in Trier. He might even have visited Spain, perhaps even Tarraco, the Roman ruins before us now.

Leave a reply