Hitler’s kidnapping of the little girl, Thomasina Edwina Ware, is observed througout the novel from the point of view of Dora, Lady Ware. Lady Ware and her husband are buffeted about by Hitler’s doings and the doings of his chief agent, Helga von Wessel. They valiantly fight back, but their opposition is winning. What can they do to succeed? They are successful as long as Hitler doesn’t get his hands on the Lawrence maps. The question is though, what is the cost to Dora and her husband, Edward?

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Hitler’s not exactly the type to bring to mind a father figure image, though he did like to hear himself called “mein Fuhrer” and gave out marital counseling advice and liked to matchmake. He did pose with various real little girls in Germany in the 30’s, but most people think of that as political posturing.

In my novel he kidnaps a little girl from England and then proceeds to convert her to his way of thinking. Thomasina actually likes “mein Vati”. And before that she calls him “Opa”, or grandfather in German. In fact, it’s the first word that Dora and Edward, her biological parents, ever hear her speak.

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Captive In The Berghof was originally book 3 in a 4 book series. First of all we had King Abdullah’s Tomb, which was originally entitled Those Who Dream By Day. Book two was called In the Shadow Of The Sphinx. Berghof was book 3. And Hitler’s Trinity was book four. The first two novels, King Abduallah’s Tomb and Sphinx, have been orphaned and cut off from the main story by later revisions, though they seem to be about the same Dora and Edward. My son calls it an alternate time line. The only two novels that fit together are Berghof and Hitler’s Trinity, which are one and two in a series.

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Hitler knows what he wants, and he wants the Lawrence maps. They are cartographic gems drawn by the late Lawrence of Arabia that explain how to take and defend every major position in the Middle East. Hitler can’t do without them. He knows oil will win the next war, and he doesn’t want to be on the losing side again as he was in the Great War when he was only a corporal. So he does everything humanly possible to get hold of them. This struggle is what makes up the plot of Captive At The Berghof. Dora thinks at the beginning that she didn’t realize when she married Edward that she was consenting to a duel to the death with the Nazi dictator.

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Part of the reason I wrote Captive At The Berghof was to make Hitler more than a two dimensional “carpet eater” who foams at the mouth and rants and raves. Instead I picture him as an astute and clever politician who knows how to get what he wants. He acts in a very self-controlled fashion. He manipulates people and plays on their weaknesses, making a fool of the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain for instance.

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The exhibit on Hitler and the Germans has been extended for 3 more weeks in February in Berlin. It had record attendance.

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Hitler and the Germans faced a demographic crisis in the 1930’s. Germany today still faces a demographic crisis that continues. This issue was dealt with by former banker Thilo Sarrazin in his book Germany Abolishes Itself, Deutschland Schafft Sich Ab. It became a bestseller during the fall of 2010.

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On October 25, 2010, sixty-five years after the end of World War II, the German government released a 900-page report about the role of the German Foreign Ministry during the Nazi era. The report was commissioned in 2005 by former Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer and was prepared by a team of German historians. Entitled “The Office and the Past: German Diplomats in the Third Reich and the Federal Republic,” the report details the ministry’s role in the Holocaust, as well as in helping former Nazi officials convicted of war crimes from being arrested after the war.

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On October 10, 2010 (10/10/10) at 10:10 A.M., the Savoy, one of London’s premier luxury hotels, reopened after a three-year, 220 million renovation. Many of the original Art Deco styles displayed in the hotel’s public rooms have been restored and retained. The Savoy is featured in several scenes in Captive at the Berghof, including one where the Wares meet with Winston Churchill at the Savoy Grill. Unfortunately, the Savoy Grill, Winston’s favorite restaurant, will not reopen until November 29th, the delay being attributed to “structural issues.” For more information about the Savoy and its famous bars and restaurants, as well as its 121-year old history, you can visit the hotel’s website, www.fairmont.com/savoy.

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On Thursday, October 14, a museum in Berlin, Germany broke new ground by opening an exhibition, for the first time since World War II ended 65 years ago, about Adolf Hitler. The exhibition, “Hitler and the Germans” (Hitler und die Deutsche), is at the German Historical Museum (Deutsches Historisches Museum) and will continue until February 4, 2011. It explores how Hitler came to power and his hold over the German people, including how the Germans themselves were looking for a strong leader to extricate them from the economic depression and social chaos of the early 1930’s. While the exhibition does not have any personal items of Hitler’s, it does display some fascinating Nazi memorabilia, including “Fuhrer-Quartett” playing cards with Hitler and other Nazi leaders on them, toy tin soldiers dressed in Nazi uniforms, and a large sideboard designed by Albert Speer for the Reich Chancellery that is inlaid with swastikas and eagles.

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